Game 16: Citizens Bank Park, Philadelphia

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For a Midwest guy like me, taking a 1 hour train ride to a completely different city is bafflingly wonderful.

We got to Philadelphia around 11:00 AM ET and spent the afternoon exploring the sites: the Liberty Bell, the “Love” statue in JFK Park*, and Independence Hall where the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution was created.

* – The Philly level in Tony Hawk Pro Skater 2.

I felt like I was living the movie National Treasure. I kept imagining myself uncovering some 300 year old Free Mason secret and running around like Nicholas Cage on rooftops. Anything that makes places like that a little more action packed is a good thing.

But before we did any of that site seeing, we had to do the most American thing anyone did yesterday: watch the USA/Germany World Cup match.

We lost, but advanced anyway. To quote Adam Schefter of ESPN: “So this is soccer for the USA: ties feel like losses, and losses feel like wins.”

I’m not a huge soccer guy, but the World Cup is a different animal. The entire nation is following the same event at the same time rooting the same way. It’s infectious.

Soccer – like football and basketball – relies on a clock. Whoever has more goals after 90 minutes wins. Whoever has more points after 4 quarters wins. And the last 5 minutes of nearly every game is spent the same way: running down the clock.

Kick the ball out of bounds.

Kneel the ball three times.

Dribble the ball at the top of the key until the shot clock runs out.

It turns into a game of survival. Instead of working to win the game, teams are trying to survive and not lose the game.

But not baseball.

Baseball is 9 innings. It’s 27 outs.

You can’t kneel to a victory or kill time. You can’t run around with the ball or stall the game.

Also – and this is the big one – there are no ties. If you go 9 innings and there isn’t a winner, you play 10, or 11, or 12. Or – like last night in Philadelphia – 14. As long as it takes for a team to win the game.* Baseball has a different concept of time than soccer.

* – The same can be said for tennis, golf, volleyball…any sport without a countdown clock.

The ancient Greeks had words for this differentiation in time: chronos versus kairos.

Chronos: literal minutes and seconds. A set, determinate amount of time. Quantitative.

Kairos: an indefinite timeframe in which everything happens. An appointed time, an opportune moment. Pregnant time. Qualitative.

Baseball occurs in Kairos time. It’s pregnant. Everything happens and you have no idea how long it will take. Soccer, football, basketball, hockey – anything with a counting timer – is in Chronos time. It’s dependent on the clock.

In 1984, the Brewers and the White Sox played a 25 inning game that lasted 8 hours and 6 minutes. In the 1940s, games would consistently last less than 2 hours.

When I go to games, I expect to stay for the entire game, no matter how long it lasts. I don’t make plans after games. It’s the last thing I’m going to do that day. I plan to settle in for the long haul.

Last night, as the game progressed, I could feel myself becoming more and more chronos time conscious. We had a 12:13am train to catch out of 30th Street Station downtown. This game was going deep into the night, and by the 10th or 11th inning I had to start calculating how much time it would take to get back and how late I could stay. Which isn’t the right mindset for ballgames for me.

My kairos moment was conflicting with my chronos schedule.

We live in constant tension between kairos and chronos time.

We want to be present and live in the moment, but we can’t because we are so conscious of our schedules. Our calendars dictate our actions more than the moments themselves.

Ephesians 5:16 – Be careful how you walk, not unwise but wise, making the best use of the time, because the days are evil.

The word “time” is referenced in the New Testament over 130 times. Fifty of them are “chronos.” Eighty of them are “kairos.”

The use of “time” here in Ephesians is not chronos. It’s kairos. It’s being present to the moment in front of you. Allowing what is pregnant to be birthed rather than forcing your agenda instead.

What moments are potentially kairos moments that we miss because we’re so enamored by chronos time. We love to focus on the “being good stewards of our time (chronos)” part of Scripture. Productivity. Maximizing our 24 hr day.

It’s a difficult perspective to adopt – especially in places like New York City. It’s extremely countercultural. Chronos time rules in our world today.

Ultimately, I had to let chronos dictate my night. I was not happy with the decision, but I had no choice. We missed a walkoff homerun by Chase Utley in the 14th inning. Plus there was a fireworks show after the game and we missed it too.

It ended up being a terrible choice to leave early anyway. I-76 was gridlocked. We missed our train and had to take a cab 2 hours back to NYC instead. Hilarious.

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Game Notes:

This one was a division battle that no one really expects to mean anything when the season is over. Going into the game, the Marlins were 39-39 and the Phillies were 35-42. The Nationals and Braves are the contenders in the NL East this year in my opinion. I don’t see there being space for anybody else.

Cole Hamels got the start for the Phillies. He’s been great this season but hasn’t gotten any run support: 2.84 ERA with only a 2-4 record. He pitched well again last night but managed gave up 3 leadoff HRs. He went 6 IP, 6 H, 3 ER and got a no decision.

The Phillies responded with three runs of their own. Utley scored on a Carlos Ruiz sac fly in the 4th to make it 2-1; In the 5th, Ben Revere singled, stole second, and scored on an Utley single to make it 2-2.

Then in the 7th, with the score 3-2, John Mayberry Jr. singled and advanced to third on a sacrifice bunt and a ground out. Jimmy Rollins hit a slow grounder to the right of first baseman Jeff Baker who attempted a few times to pick it up but couldn’t put a fork in it. Mayberry scored on the error to knot the game at 3-3.

In a questionable move, Phillies manager and former Cubs second baseman, Ryne Sandberg, decided to use Tony Gwynn Jr. off the bench to bunt in the pitchers spot to advance Mayberry. He did his job well, but one wonders if Hamels couldn’t’ve dropped his own bunt and the Phillies saved a pinch hitter for a game that looked destined to go extras. Ultimately, it didn’t come back to bite them.

In extras, the Phillies had their chances in nearly every inning but couldn’t plate anyone. They stranded 7 baserunners from the 10th-13th innings before Utley got tired of the lack of hitting with RISP and deposited one over the left field wall.

The Phillies kept it tied too by stellar defense by Cody Asche at 3B. A barehanded play in the 8th, a diving stop and throw in the 10th, started a double play in the 11th and made a leaping catch in the 14th. He was a human highlight reel in the field.

Utley played the hero in the end. The Phillies broke my home team losing streak. Here’s to hoping the Yankees start a new streak tonight in the Bronx.

Sixteen down. Fourteen to go.

Up next: New York Yankees.

-apc.

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