World Series Game 2: An incredible game of inches (feat. Puig’s glove & bat).

What a game. The Astros beat the Dodgers last night in one of the more entertaining World Series games you’ll ever see.

Dodgers led early. Astros tied it late and took the lead in extras. Dodgers tied it up again. Astros took the lead back. Dodgers brought the tying run to the plate in the 12th, but couldn’t close the gap a second time. Astros won 7-6.

As is the case with most baseball games played at the highest level, the one came down to a handful of plays that tipped the scale the Astros’ way. This one seemed to have a dozen such moments – “game of inches” moments where neither team necessarily did one thing better than the other, the ball simply found a glove or didn’t, and they all would’ve had drastic implications on the turnout of the game.

For example, the ball that landed in front of a diving Chris Taylor. Instead of bouncing over the centerfielder’s head and rolling to the wall for a possible triple or inside-the-park home run, it caught the bill of Taylor’s cap and rebounded directly into the hands of Joc Pederson in left. Game of inches.

Or another example: In the bottom of the 11th, down two runs, both Corey Seager and Justin Turner hit rockets off Houston reliever Chris Devenski. Seager’s found the mitt of Cameron Maybin deep in the outfield, Turner’s was hit directly to Carlos Correa. If either of those balls are hit slightly up, down, left or right on the bat/ball, Charlie Culberson‘s home run is a 2- or 3-run shot instead, and his reaction around the bases is much more appropriate to the situation. Game of inches.

A third example: In the bottom of the 10th with the game tied and two outs, Devenski tried to pick Enrique Hernandez off of second base. The throw was wild and sailed 10 feet to the shortstop side of the base. Cameron Maybin was shifted towards right field and there was a lot of green grass available out in left-center. For a moment, it looked like Hernandez was going to advance to third, and potentially score if Maybin wasn’t able to scamper over to it quick enough. Instead, the ball hit umpire Laz Diaz in the thigh, thudded to the ground. Instead of being the winning run, Hernandez wasn’t able to advance advance at all. Game of inches.

The moment that defined the game for me more than any other is really two moments – the second a response to the first. This “game of inches” moment happened in the top of the 8th, with the Dodgers leading 3-1.

Alex Bregman led off and sliced a fly ball into the right field corner. Off the bat it seemed destined to find grass, but Yasiel Puig made a long long run and looked to have a beat on it and this wouldn’t be his first magical defensive play. He dove headfirst toward the corner, glove hand extended. The ball found leather, but not enough leather. It ricocheted off Puig’s glove, bounced once off the outfield grass and over the short wall in the right field corner for a ground rule double. Game of inches.

Within a matter of seconds, Puig hopped to his feet and did this:

102517_lad_puig_glove_spike_med

A quick aside: Yasiel Puig is wonderful and so good for the game of baseball. He’s having fun, but not at the expense of his team or his own success. There have been times a times when many of us – myself included – wondered whether he would be able to dial it in to where his energy was a positive and not a negative. When he was sent down to AAA in Oklahoma City last season I wondered if Puig’s actions were indeed misguided. I think he’s proven this season that he can be fun and quirky and play with significant passion without it negatively impacting the outcome of the game.

Yet announcers continue to use words like “emotion” and “passion” (which I recognize I also used above) to describe him, but their words are still laced with so much disdain.  No one defends him. No one says they like him or support him or even enjoy him. Instead, they drop judgmental comments about his antics and say loudly that they disapprove without needing to say it at all. So of course when he stands up from missing the fly ball, the internet and the broadcast booth are too focused on the outburst and fail to understand what’s totally happening in that moment.

Puig’s glove spike reminded me of Moises Alou’s outburst in the 2003 NLCS when Steve Bartman leaned over the left field rail at Wrigley Field and interfered with a ball that probably would’ve landed in Alou’s glove. Alou threw a tantrum, spiked his glove and glowered at Bartman from the left field foul line. I remember watching that game thinking he was acting like such a baby. Throwing your glove because and barking at a fan? Cmon, man.

But there’s an obvious difference between the two situations. Alou was crying about someone else, about something out of his control. Alou’s screaming and whining is directed away from himself and toward Bartman. Puig is mad at himself, his own effort. Which is always totally fine in sports.

The glove spike communicates three things to me:

  1. Yasiel Puig desires to perform to the best of his ability.
  2. Yasiel Puig wants to win very badly.
  3. Yasiel Puig understands the situation well.

And what’s the situation? Instead of making the first out of the inning, there’s now a runner in scoring position in a 2-run game with the Astros best bats coming up in Jose Altuve and Carlos Correa. Second, and of perhaps even more importance, Dave Roberts is forced to turn to Kenley Jansen earlier than desired to get the final 6 outs. If the tying run isn’t at the plate, Jansen likely stays in the bullpen and starts with a fresh 9th.

Altuve advanced Bregman to third on a ground out. Correa slapped one up the middle for a single, scoring Bregman and making it a 1-run ballgame. Jansen then gave up a solo homer to Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th to tie the game, 3-3.

Now, if Puig catches that ball, it’s the first out of the inning, Altuve’s grounder is the second out, and Correa is stranded at first because Yuli Gurriel popped out immediately after and that would’ve ended the inning. Granted, all of those happenings could have changed with 1 out and nobody on and Brandon Morrow still pitching instead of Kenley Jansen.

Baseball-Reference.com gave the Astros a 13% chance of victory before the Bregman double, and a 22% chance after – the miss cost the Dodgers 9%. If Puig catches the ball, that number likely drops from 13% to something like 7%, a difference of 4%. Overall, a 15% swing in winning probability added (WPA).

Here’s the other thing that moment did though: it lit a fire in Yasiel Puig. Yes, he always plays with passion, but a moment like that gets under your skin and effects how you view the game from that point farther. Puig feels responsible for a chunk of the team’s winning probability (again, around 15%), and he wants to do right by himself and his team. A player like Puig wants to fix where he erred, and his opportunity to do it is at the plate.

Which brings us to the second moment – the response to the first.

By the time Puig bats again, he’s leading off the bottom of the 10th and the Astros have taken a 5-3 lead. Houston is sitting pretty at a 91% chance to win the game.

Puig, of course, destroys the baseball and does this:

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Do you see what Puig does here?! He is re-writing his own narrative. This is so great, and I hope I can do a solid job explaining what I love about it.

First, he unloads on the baseball, undoing the damage he feels he inflicted by being unable to corral the catch earlier (which few players even get to, let alone nearly catch). That homer dropped the Astros’ WPA from 91% to 80% according to Baseball-Reference. That’s 11%, which is greater than 9%, if you’re keeping score at home like Puig undoubtedly is in hi ahead. If he’d made an out, the Astros WPA jumps to something like 96%, a jump of 5% and an overall net of 16%, which is greater than 15%, the overall WPA adjustment when he didn’t catch the ball. In one swing, he has mathematically salvaged what he feels he shouldn’t have allowed earlier.

But he’s not done – and this is the amazing part: Puig, the guy who is notorious for smooth yet obscene batflips in all sorts of moments, slowly and methodically places the murder weapon on the grass.

Why?

Because he spiked the glove in the field.

Do you see what he’s doing?! It’s brilliant. He made up for the ground rule double by hitting the dinger, but he’s also reconciling his reaction to the play. Setting down the bat undoes his glove spike! His response in the good undoes his response in the bad. If he bat flips, he’s doubling down on passion. But by setting the bat down gently, he is actively adjusting his own narrative away from the out of control player with too much emotion for the game and toward the centered ballplayer who is focused enough to perform calmly in the biggest of moments.

Of course, after reconciling his performance and his character, he’s back even when he came up to the plate as the tying run with two outs in the bottom of the 11th. This time he doesn’t have a score to settle so who knows what he’s going to do.

He struck out.

Photo: AP Photo/Mark J. Terrell. Accessed here.

 

Royals-Astros ALDS Primer & Prediction

The Royals are in the ALDS and they didn’t even have to survive a dramatic and emotional Wild Card game. I feel like we cheated somehow, but, no, we actually just won 95 games.

I actually wrote this on Tuesday night as the Wild Card game was wrapping up, but, as it turns out, when you’re not connected to WiFi, WordPress doesn’t auto-save your content like usual, and when you click “Publish,” it moves to a page that says “Safari isn’t connected to the internet,” and you lose everything. Woof. An hour of my life I’ll never get back.

So let’s try it again. I’ve written it once before, so it should be better the second time around, right? That’s how that works. Fur sure.

Dallas “I think I’m better on short rest” Keuchel shut down the New York Yankees 3-0 on Tuesday night on just 3 days rest. The Yankees looked pitiful – so pitiful, in fact, that I was confident enough to start writing this post around the bottom of the 7th inning. The Yankees would’ve been the easier matchup for Kansas City, but no dice. Here we are, and it’s the Astros.

So how do the Royals matchup against Houston? Let’s take a gander.

Offense

The Astros and Royals couldn’t be more different in philosophy, yet they scored nearly the same number of runs on the season. Astros scored 729 and the Royals scored 724 – good for 6th and 7th in the MLB.

Houston relies heavily on the long ball. They finished 2nd in all of baseball with 230 HRs behind only Toronto (232). Nearly every guy in their lineup can go yard – Evan Gattis, Carlos Correa, Luis Valbuena, Colby Rasmus and Chris Carter all hit 20+ HRs. They take their hacks, and they connect a lot, but they miss way more often. The Astros stuck out more than any team in the American League, and more than any team in baseball when you eliminate pitcher statistics. 

Their contact rate is 75.9% – the worst in the American League. Expect Royals pitchers to rack up the K’s in this series.

The Royals, on the other hand, are obsessed with making contact. Best in baseball at 81.9%. (It’s amazing what a difference 6% is over the course of 162 games.) They finished not last (!) in the AL in home runs this year. It’s a miracle. They hit 3 more than the Chicago White Sox, who are the absolute worst.

It’s interesting that two opposite philosophies yielded the same overall results. The edge really boils down to the ballpark. In Houston, home runs are much easier to come by with the Crawford boxes in left field. Kauffman Stadium is a pitcher’s park with a huge outfield and homers aren’t nearly as common. With home field advantage, the Royals get the slight edge. Barely.

Edge: Royals, slightly.

Defense

Another year at the top for KC.

The Royals finished another year with the most defensive runs saved (DRS) in baseball: 56.9. They’ve got gold glovers are nearly every position. Even their adventurous right fielder, Alex Rios, is an advantage over the rest of the AL teams in the playoffs with -0.2 runs saved above average. That’s how bad AL right fielders are, and thats why the MLB made a major mistake giving away Gold Gloves to LF-CF-RF instead of just 3 outfielders. 

Anyway. The Astros shift on the infield more than any other team in baseball, yet still finished the season below the middle of the pack in DRS at -7.6. Their outfield defense, however, is solid, and that’s what matters most at The K. Carlos Gomez, George Springer and Colby Rasmus can cover some ground. They play a strange shallow outfield alignment that just begs to be burned, hopefully that doesn’t take the Royals out of their offensive game plan. Overall they’re better than the numbers suggest. They’re average, but they’ve “got it where it counts,” so they say.

But they’re not the Royals defense. C’mon. This defense is historically good. Moving on.

Edge: Royals.

Starting Pitching

Game 1: Collin McHugh vs Yordano Ventura

Collin McHugh’s best pitch is the slider which he throws 38% of the time. His put away pitch is the curveball, but I’ll be surprised if he has many opportunities to throw it. He throws first pitch fastballs almost half the time, and I expect the Royals high contact offense to jump on them early and often. The more KC puts the ball in play, the more KC has the advantage.

Yordano Ventura seems to have redeveloped into the “ace” that he is. Ever since he got “sent down” to Omaha but then brought right “back” after Jason Vargas needed Tommy John surgery. And ever since Johnny Cueto has shown up, it seems Yordano has learned a little bit about deception and his K rate is suddenly through the roof. In his last 11 starts, Ace has struck out 81 batters. In his previous 17 starts, he had only whiffed 75. He’s notched 11 K’s in three different starts recently – a feat he had never done in his career to this point.

So let’s do the math – McHugh throws first pitch fastballs to a high contact team, and Ventura is striking out the masses against a high strikeout team. This matchup favors KC significantly.

Game 2: Scott Kazmir vs Johnny Cueto

Scott Kazmir was the first domino to fall at the trade deadline coming to Houston from the Athletics. The Royals faced him on July 24 – the day after he was traded – at Kauffman Stadium and Kazmir absolutely shut KC down: 7 innings. 3 hits. 0 runs.

But in August and September, it’s been a very different story for Kazmir. In his last 11 starts, he’s 1-6 with a 5.22 ERA. He went from being a solid compliment to Dallas Keuchel to barely being considered as a postseason starter.

This should sound familiar to Royals fans because it’s almost exactly the same narrative we’ve experienced with Johnny Cueto, Kazmir’s Game 2 opponent. Cueto looked awesome in his first few starts, but had a string of 5 straight starts where he looked absolutely dreadful. Finally, after significant confusion as to what was happening, it was revealed that Cueto wasn’t comfortable with how Salvador Perez was setting up. That’s since been resolved, and Cueto has spun 4 straight quality starts with a 3.24 ERA. His last start vs Minnesota was a 5 inning, 1 run tune up.

It would seem that Cueto has the edge here, and I hope he does, because Game 3 isn’t as promising.

Game 3: Edinson Volquez vs Dallas Keuchel

Let’s not over think this one – Dallas Keuchel is the best pitcher in the American League. He will be the 2015 AL Cy Young winner. He also has the best beard.

Or maybe we should over think this, just for fun. 

In his career, Edison Volquez is 6-0 with a 2.70 ERA. He’s 3-0 at Minute Maid Park. Current Royals are a career .300/.380/.393 off Keuchel. In 2015, Lorenzo Cain is 5-7 with 2 doubles and a home run. And it’s the Postseason…anything can happen.

But let’s be honest, it would be stupid to pick against Keuchel here.

Game 4: Kris Medlen/Chris Young vs Lance McCullers

Lance McCullers is a rookie for the Astros. He’s got a reverse split so he’s stronger against lefties. He is terrific at home (1.86 ERA) and absolutely awful on the road (5.03 ERA). As much as one would like to think the Astros have confidence in Kazmir, the reality might be that they have more confidence in McCullers in Game 4 than they do in Kazmir anywhere.

But wouldn’t you know, Kris Medlen is terrific on the road, but awful at home. Of Medlen’s 26 earned runs this year for the Royals, 24 of them have been at Kauffman Stadium. I don’t really know how that works, but it’s the truth.

This game is a total toss up, to be honest. Heck, Chris Young could even start, and he’s been even better than Yordano over his past two spot starts leading up to the playoffs. My best guess: Medlen gets the start with a VERY short leash. Gets the hook if anything happens and Young takes over from there.

Assuming Yordano Ventura is waiting to throw Game 5, That gives KC the overall advantage, I think. If we had to face Keuchel twice, I might consider it a push, but the nod goes to KC here too.

Edge: Royals, based only on matchups.

Bullpen

See: defense.

Again, both teams are really good at this phase of the game, but the Royals, again, are simply the best in baseball. Wade Davis. Kelvin Herrera. Ryan Madson. Even with the loss of Greg Holland to a torn UCL, this bullpen is the best there is. In fact, with the addition of Danny Duffy, it’s very possible this bullpen is better without Greg Holland. Now you have a shut down lefty in the pen instead of a guy who has done nothing but terrify Royals fans for months.

But the Astros bullpen is no slouch. The Astros watched what the Royals were able to do in the postseason last year, and immediately went out and signed Luke Gregerson and Pat Neshek out the gate during the offseason to shore up their bullpen. Will Harris and Tony Sipp have emerged as strong pieces as well. Their bullpen is really good, but it’s not as good as KC.

Edge: Royals.

Baserunning

That’s what speed do.

The Astros are quick on the bases. They led the American League in stolen bases in 2015 with 121. Jose Altuve leads the way with 38 bags. Jake Marisnick stole 24. George Springer added 16 and Carlos Correa, 14. This team likes to run, which I find interesting because they’re a home run hitting team. But I suppose that also means they know how to hit sac flies.

However, Games 1 and 5 will be an issue for their running game, as Yordano Ventura is so quick to the plate, its essentially mathematically impossible for opposing team to steal on him. It takes a breaking pitch, a double clutch and a poor throw by Salvador Perez to make the play close. So if they’re going to steal, they’ll need to run on somebody else.

The Royals had 104 steals this year – a dip from previous years in the running game likely do to a slight increase in power. They simply haven’t needed to use their legs as much this year. But they have speed whenever they want it off the bench. Jarrod Dyson has gotten “ZOOM” etched into his hair again this year. He ready. But he’s not even the fastest guy on his own team. Terrance Gore is the fastest man in baseball (if he doesn’t get left off the postseason roster in favor of Jonny Gomes, that is). Oh, and Paulo Orlando used to be a sprinter for Brazil soooooo…

The Royals haven’t needed the running game in 2015, but it’s still there at their disposal when they need it. And they will, because the playoffs are drastically different.

Edge: Royals.

Prediction

It’s a trend, fur sure, but it’s also a reality – the Astros are a very good team, but the Royals are slightly better in every facet of the game. They’re faster. Their bullpen is deeper and stronger. their ballpark matches up better for the offense. Their rotation is probably weaker, but the matchups still give the Royals an edge.

On paper, I’d expect the Royals to win comfortably in Game 1 – confidence high. Game 2 is somewhat of a mystery, but barring Kazmir turning into Houdini, things seem to point to the Royals there too – confidence moderate. Gotta expect a loss to Keuchel in Game 3 – confidence low – but a bounce back win in Game 4 after five different Royals pitchers combine for a n0-hit bid deep into the ballgame – confidence high.

Make no mistake – this Astros team is talented. The 2015 Astros hope to be the 2014 Royals. They play with heart and have a lot of fun doing it. And in baseball, anyone can win on any night. It’s a game of inches, and all it doesn’t take much to make all these hot takes meaningless. Even the best teams only win about 60% of the time in this league. I don’t want to get too confident here, so let’s assume the worst about Game 2 and say…

Royals in 5.

-apc.

Photo courtesy of Hex FX Ariels. Follow on Twitter at @FXHex.

Game 6: Minute Maid Park, Houston

I was born in Houston.

Sometimes I forget that about myself. I only lived there for a few months before moving to Kansas City, so I obviously have no memories there myself, just second hand stories my parents have told me for years and years.

I went to my first ballgame in Houston. On April 6, 1986, was 23 days old and the Braves were in town playing the Astros. My dad wanted to take me to a Sunday afternoon game at the Astrodome. My mom agreed on one condition: he has to go to church before he goes to a ballgame.

So even as an infant, these two themes – church and baseball – were already becoming a part of my life trajectory.

The Astrodome, unfortunately, is just sitting as an empty crumbling shell next door to the Texans’ Reliant Stadium. When the Astrodome was built in 1966, it was described as being the “8th Wonder of the World” – a fully enclosed, climate controlled, indoor facility to protect the fans from the humidity capitol of the world.

The Astrodome also brought with it AstroTurf, which is where it gets its goofy name. They tried to grow real grass in there for a year, but even first graders know that grass needs sunlight to survive. It all died, and they replaced it with the fake stuff. Today, the only stadium still sporting turf is in Toronto.

Thankfully, the city declared it a historic landmark this past year and won’t knock it down now. My vote is to renovate it in another 10 years or so and turn it into a sweet concert venue. It’s too nostalgic to do away with and it’s too much of a monstrosity to just let sit idle.

Check out this Astrodome gallery here.

The Astros left their dome and moved downtown in 2000 for The Ballpark at Union Station, which was a great descriptor because the primary entrance is through the old Union Station concourse built in 1911. But quickly they found an opportunity for extra revenue when it became Enron Field that same year. Then Enron…happened, and it dropped the name for a few months and became Astros Field until it found its current suitor: Minute Maid.

Minute Maid is a unique park, and some people even called it the “9th Wonder of the World” when it was being built. It has a giant retractable roof with a retractable glass wall that goes up above the archways in LF, completely enclosing the ballpark. This is essential in the dog days of summer, but in April, it’s wide open and feels extremely comfortable outside.

Along with the Union Station design, MMP has a couple other interesting bits about it. The giant concrete archways in LF make for a really cool view from behind the plate, and above the arches sits a locomotive on a short track that runs back and forth whenever the Astros hit a homer.

Underneath one of the arches is a big gas pump with a home run counter on it referred to as the Home Run Pump.

Just to the left of the pump, down on the field, is the most unique stadium design in the majors, I think: The Hill.

At it’s widest point, the hill is 90 feet across – much larger than it looks on TV – and at the top of the hill, in the field of play, is a flag pole. It’s 436 to the wall in straight away CF – Simmons home run in Atlanta on Sunday would’ve stayed in the yard at MMP – but occasionally a ball is it up on that hill and every time I get nervous the CF is going to injure himself trying to run up it.

Yesterday was Jackie Robinson Day across the MLB. It’s a day when every single player wears the number that no player will ever wear again out of respect to the man who broke the color barrier and integrated baseball with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

His number, 42,  is now retired in every ballpark across the nation.

The man with the second most ballparks with his number retired: Nolan Ryan – Angels, Rangers and Astros all three have his name and number on display.

Nolan Ryan’s name was attached to another hot dog too. This time it was a chili cheese brisket dog. Two nights in a row going for a Nolan Ryan Beef meal. Delicious decisions on both accounts.

Over the past two games, my friend Nick has joined me along with Wally, Ryan and Rapley and sons. Nick is a photographer for my publisher, The House Studio, so he came along to shoot some promotional material for the project. Until Monday, I thought it would just be he and I in H-Town.

IMG_6261But my buddy, Dan, found out he was going to be in Austin for work on Monday and could rent a car and make the trip over to Houston in time for the game. So it was the three of us going to see the Astros.

Except we weren’t really going to see the Astros. We were going to see the visiting Royals.

As has been my custom at each ballpark so far, I have worn the hat of the home team and tried my best to blend in as one of them. Things were different last night in Houston.

I wore my orange Houston cap.

But I was yelling loudly for the visitors.

Also, in an unintentional darkhorse move, I wore my KC Monarchs t-shirt under my hoodie, which was somehow perfect because it 1. supported Kansas City, 2. repped the Negro Leagues on Jackie Robinson Day, and 3. it matched my Astros cap decently.

I decided to get us the cheapest tickets available since the Astros draw hardly any fans nowadays. We ended up standing under one of the archways in LF the entire game spitting sunflower shells on to the warning track. We got pretty rowdy cheering for the Royals after a while – especially after Lorenzo Cain starting communicating with us pretty regularly in about the 3rd inning.

I got a few curious glares from some of the Astros fans. Probably weird to find a guy wearing a Houston cap rooting so openly for the opponent. On one occasion, when Greg Holland was in the game effectively shutting the door on the Astros hopes, a woman standing next to us turned to her husband and said loudly, “Let’s go. These Royals guys are starting to bug me.”

And I don’t blame her. I know what that’s like. I’ve seen the Yankees come to Kansas City and hated listening to their fans cheer louder than ours. It’s obnoxious and infuriating. These fans are stepping into our ballpark, our sacred ground, and acting like they belong and run the show. It’s insulting.

We try really hard to draw lines in the sand between things that we find sacred and things we don’t. We all do it: our homes, our desks, our neighborhoods and our personal space*, they’re all defined in each of our minds as belonging to us. And when someone else crosses those defined lines and wrongly enters our spaces, our frustration elevates as we watch our sacred space become profane.

* – As I write this post, I’m on a flight from Houston to Phoenix, and the guy next to me is leaning confidently into my personal space. My arms are pinned to my sides to where I’m typing like a T-Rex. He has crossed into my space and made it thoroughly profane.

It’s okay to have a group over for a BBQ out on your deck or a nice dinner in your dining room, but if your friend decided to go upstairs, lay down in your bed and turn on old episodes of Jimmy Fallon, you’d probably feel like a line was crossed.

We all do this.

And we hate it when others move into our sacred spaces when they don’t belong there.

Which is interesting to note considering that yesterday was Jackie Robinson Day. For decades, baseball was segregated into the Major Leagues and the Negro Leagues. Players like Josh Gibson, Cool Papa Bell and Oscar Charleston were some of the best players of all time, yet few know much about them because they weren’t allowed to play in the MLB.

Today, we celebrate a history African American players who are celebrated as some of the best to ever play the game: Hank Aaron, Bob Gibson, Ken Griffey Jr., Joe Morgan, Rickey Henderson, Willie Mays.

But in the 1940s, when Jackie Robinson finally entered the world of white baseball, he was viewed by many as an outsider stepping into a well defined space. Managers, fans, and even other players hated him for stepping into an area they believed he didn’t belong. In their minds, he was making their “sacred space” profane.

The difference, however, is that he did belong.

He had every right to play baseball, and today we can celebrate the fact that baseball- and life itself – is for everyone to participate in equally.

Scripture is jam packed with themes of sacred and profane. Depending on your family, gender, occupation, health condition, or nationality, you could only enter certain levels of the Temple. Judeans and Samaritans wouldn’t mix. Gentiles had no business in the synagogues. Women had little prominence in society. Anyone with an illness wasn’t allowed to be touched and couldn’t join in gatherings for certain periods.

And Jesus broke these socially defined spaces all the time.

Which is why the outsiders loved him, and the insiders ended up crucifying him.

Anyway. I’m excited to explore this sacred/profane conversation more in depth later. But this blog is already getting super long (because it’s a longer flight today, and there’s nothing else to do but type), so I better move on to some game notes and wrap this thing up.

Game Notes:

The top story line from last night’s game: Yordano Ventura got his first win of his career. Ventura is going to be amazing. The Royals need to lock him up for a long term contract immediately. It’s baffling to watch a 5’11” dude put triple digits on the radar gun in the 7th inning, but that’s the kind of pitcher he is. He’s my pick for the AL Rookie of the Year.

Ventura only allowed 7 base runners the whole night. Wade Davis pitched a perfect 8th. Holland pitched a perfect 9th. They looked really good, but then again, the Astros are really bad.

Last time Astros starter Lucas Harrell pitched against the Royals he went 7 IP, 2 H, 0 R…so there was some reason to think he might perform well against KC last night. Instead he went 5 IP, 5 H, 4 R, and after the game he was designated for assignment. He’s had a rough season so far – 12.1 IP, 9.49 ERA in 3 starts.

The Royals doubled their home run count in the 1st inning when Omar Infante hit a solo shot to the short porch in LF.

Lorenzo Cain became our best friend last night. He hit a ball right below us to LCF that went just under the glove of the left fielder and Cain ended up at third. They called it an error and gave him a single. He scored on an Omar Infante grounder a few batters later.

When he came back out to CF after the Royals got out, we started hollering at him that he should’ve gotten a triple just like he should’ve gotten a Gold Glove last season. He laughed, shrugged his shoulders and gave us a thumbs up. For the rest of the game, any time the Royals did anything good, he would turn around smiling and give us a nod. Basically we’re best friends now and he’s probably coming over to play RBI Baseball with me after he gets home from Houston.

Six down. Twenty-Four to go.

Up next: Arizona Diamondbacks

-apc.