Ballpark Tour 2014: Panoramas

I took SO MANY panoramas in 2014! I took at least one – often dozens – at each ballpark on my Tour this season. This series marks the best of those panoramas at each game. They have all been amateurishly edited and cropped for consistency.

All in all, I’m very pleased with how these turned out. Again, something magical is happening in the Bay Area, or maybe that’s just where my pano skills reached pro form. I’m also pleased with the shots of Citizens Bank Park and US Cellular Field.

I am a bit disappointed with myself that I didn’t plan ahead better for this series. I could’ve taken them all from the same location in every park or at least waited until other fans arrived and the game was going on – I feel like about half of these feature the grounds crew. Oh well. Too late. Spilled milk.

In case you missed past posts – check out my original Tour Itinerary and the first draft of my Ballpark Rankingus. Might be worth the read if ballparks are your thing.

Okay, enough writing. You didn’t come here to read words, you came to look at photos which are with 1,000 words each. So here’s 30,000 words on the 30 MLB ballparks in order my visit starting with Cincinnati on Opening Day. Enjoy.

Note: the date/name goes with the pano below it. It gets confusing after a bit of scrolling.

March 31: Great American Ballpark – Cincinnati Reds

Great American Ballpark

April 4: Kauffman Stadium – Kansas City Royals

Kauffman Stadium

April 7: Busch Stadium – St. Louis Cardinals

Busch Stadium

April 13: Turner Field – Atlanta Braves

Turner Field

April 14: Globe Life Park at Arlington – Texas Rangers

Globe Life Park at Arlington

April 15: Minute Maid Park – Houston Astros

Minute Maid Park

April 16: Chase Field – Arizona Diamondbacks

Chase Field

April 17: PETCO Park – San Diego Padres

PETCO Park

May 8: Dodger Stadium – Los Angeles Dodgers

Dodger Stadium

May 9: Safeco Field – Seattle Mariners

Safeco Field

May 10: O.Co Coliseum – Oakland Athletics

O.Co Coliseum

May 12: AT&T Park – San Francisco Giants

AT&T Park

June 3: Coors Field – Colorado Rockies

Coors Field

June 11: Angel Stadium – Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Angel Stadium

June 25: Citi Field – New York Mets

Citi Field

June 26: Citizens Bank Park – Philadelphia Phillies

Citizens Bank Park

June 27: Yankee Stadium – New York Yankees

Tankee Stadium

June 30: Fenway Park – Boston Red Sox

Fenway Park

July 1: Nationals Park – Washington Nationals

Nationals Park

July 2: Oriole Park at Camden Yards – Baltimore Orioles

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

August 6: US Cellular Field – Chicago White Sox

US Cellular Field

August 7: Miller Park – Milwaukee Brewers

Miller Park

August 7: Wrigley Field – Chicago Cubs

Wrigley Field

September 3: Target Field – Minnesota Twins

Target Field

September 17: Tropicana Field – Tampa Bay Rays

Tropicana Field

September 18: Marlins Park – Miami Marlins

Marlins Park

September 21: PNC Park – Pittsburgh Pirates

PNC Park

September 22: Rogers Centre – Toronto Blue Jays

Rogers Centre

September 23: Comerica Park – Detroit Tigers

Comerica Park

September 24: Progressive Field – Cleveland Indians

Progressive Field

So many memories from a crazy summer. I’m excited to share them with you when my book comes out next year.

I’m trying to figure out what I should do with this collection beyond this post. Probably a coffee table book or something. Let me know what ideas you might have.

-apc.

APC’s MLB Ballpark Rankings

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After touring all 30 MLB ballparks this summer, I get asked almost daily which one was my favorite, and it’s always so difficult to say. I loved them all in one way or another. Even the ones at the bottom of the list had bright spots that I appreciated about them. Even Tampa.

Besides, how am I supposed to pick ONE favorite park? That’s like asking me to pick a favorite fruit or Jeff Goldblum* movie.

How does one compare Fenway Park and PNC Park? Or Safeco Field and Dodger Stadium? Or Marlins Park and US Cellular Field? These pairings have very little in common, but yet they each appear right next to one another on my initial rankings. Do I favor Boston’s history over Pittsburgh’s downtown vista? Do I favor Seattle’ retractable roof over LA’s classic 50’s flare? And how does one even attempt to compare Marlins Park to any other ballpark in the game, let alone perhaps the most basic concrete cookie-cutter park in existence?

Some gorgeous ballparks have terrible teams (San Diego or Colorado, for example) or lousy fans (New York or Los Angeles) while some really ugly ballparks field a championship contending team and have great fans (Oakland, for example).

It’s not an easy ranking to do, and the “right” answer isn’t immediately clear.

What was clear was that I was going to need to put together some sort of algorithm in order to effectively rank these ballparks. I needed to land on some systematic approach to ranking various categories from 1-30 and assign point values for each. I was also going to need to give certain categories more weight than others.

This is still all completely subjective, but it gives me a little bit more to lean on besides a purely arbitrary ranking. Here are the initial 5 categories that I’ve utilized to rank. I should add that this is NOT my “official” list – just a first attempt mock up. Here we go…

  • Ballpark Design (BD): 65% – This category should obviously hold the most weight, so I’ve given it nearly 2/3 of the score. This category includes architecture, views, features, and history. If you push me hard enough, I may pull out the history and re-rank with that as a separate category. We’ll see.
  • Surrounding Area (SA): 15% – If I learned one thing about ballparks this summer it’s this: the best ballparks are usually downtown, and they’re usually surrounded by some spectacular spots to hang out and grab some local food and a beer before or after the game. If it’s nothing but parking lot – the experience isn’t nearly as great. This category also includes transportation to and from the ballpark.
  • Gameplay (GP): 10% – I also acknowledge that my rankings are going to be based primarily on how much fun the single game I attended was. Rather than try to ignore this and eliminate the bias, I’m choosing to include it in my rankings. It’s not a significant percentage, but it’s enough to bump Oakland as high as #26.
  • Fan Rank (FR): 8% – Every city has diehard fans, but not all of them enhance the experience at the ballpark. This is probably the category that will get me the most flack.
  • Beer Rank (BR): 2% – The Washington Post did a survey on which ballparks had the best micro-brewery beer selection and ranked them 1-30. I haven’t tweaked these numbers at all, they’re directly from the article linked above. I’m not sure if 2% was enough to influence any one ballpark over another, but it’s a crucial part of the stadium experience.

I need to probably add a history, city, and food category, but this will suffice for now. Let me know what other ideas you have. For now, here’s what I ended up with for my initial results. First place received 30 points in each category. Last place received 1 point. I’ve broken it down into 7 tiers…

Tier 7: I Don’t Care If I Ever Get Back

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30. Tropicana Field, Tampa Bay Rays – 2.55 (BD 1, SA 8, FR 2, GP 4, BR 7)

The only thing I liked about Tampa was the old man I kept score with during the last two innings who kept dropping f-bombs. He’s the only reason they didn’t finish dead last in Fan Rank.

29. Globe Life Park at Arlington, Texas Rangers – 3.91 (BD 3, SA 6, GP 1, FR 9, BR 12)

Freezing cold game. Rangers got pounded. No views. Like playing ball in an ugly castle courtyard.

28. Marlins Park, Miami Marlins – 5.97 (BD 6, SA 7, GP 3, FR 7, BR 8)

Modern design, unlike any others, but it just didn’t feel like baseball. The game was so boring that I left my seat to go find a TV with the K-State/Auburn game on it.

Tier 6: The Bronx Bummers

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27. US Cellular Field, Chicago White Sox – 7.25 (BD 4, SA 13, GP 14, FR 11, BR 21)

The last ballpark built in the concrete cookie-cutter era of park design. Very basic and unexciting. Good beer selection though and you can’t beat the L train dropping you off right by the park.

26. O.Co Coliseum, Oakland Athletics – 7.33 (BD 2, SA, 3, GP 30, FR 29, BR 13)

One of the ugliest ballparks in the game, and the only one that can really give The Trop a run for its money. This was the best game on the tour though – walk off double and on field fireworks after the game. Impressive tailgating and dedicated fans too.

25. Angels Stadium, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 8.28 (BD 11, SA 1, GP 2, FR 6, BR 15)

Right around the corner from Disneyland, this ballpark felt like an amusement park. Took 2 hours to drive there in LA traffic. The parking lots surrounding it aren’t lit well at all. All that, and they got torched by the Athletics.

24. Yankee Stadium, New York Yankees – 9.27 (BD 7, SA 20, GP 13, FR 5, BR 1)

Impressive? Sure. The monuments and history are certainly something. Otherwise, Yankees Stadium wasn’t all I had expected it to be. It’s too big for baseball. Big fan of the neverending popcorn bucket. Worst beer selection in baseball.

Tier 5: The Forgettables

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23. Chase Field, Arizona Diamondbacks – 10.21 (BD 9, SA 18, GP 5, FR 14, BR 2)

Cavernous interior space. Swimming pool beyond centerfield. Downtown Phoenix is pretty cool, and the fans seem pretty committed for such a young franchise. This might rank higher if the roof was open.

22. Nationals Park, Washington Natinoals – 10.75 (BD 8, SA 15, GP 19, FR 13, BR 18)

Humid. Woof. Fans were making up new chants – even if those chants were basically the J-E-T-S chant with 50% different letters. Stephen Strasburg pitched a gem while I was there. Is there a time of year when D.C. isn’t ultra sweaty?

21. Progressive Field, Cleveland Indians – 10.91 (BD 5, SA 26, GP 16, FR 20, BR 28)

Awkward interior dimensions, distinct 90s ballpark vibe, and not in a good way. Passionate fans. Downtown Cleveland is super cool.

20. Rogers Centre, Toronto Blue Jays – 11.36 (BD 10, SA 16, GP 17, FR 8, BR 6)

Toronto is basically Canadian Chicago, and that’s a good thing. Another “wish the roof had been open” ballpark. This game was in the middle of the pennant race against Seattle, so it was extra rewarding to watch the Jays pile on the runs.

19. Comerica Park, Detroit Tigers – 13.08 (BD 13, SA 9, GP 15, FR 16, BR 25)

Conflicting game watching the Tigers win and move one step closer to clinching the AL Central over the Royals. Downtown Detriot is not great, but Comerica itself was a very nice space. Curmudgeony upper deck vendors too.

18. Citizens Bank Park, Philadelphia Phillies – 13.46 (BD 14, SA 4, GP 24, FR 12, BR 20)

Awesome game. Fourteen inning Chase Utley walkoff. Beautiful ballpark. Delicious hot dog. Ivy covered batters eye was my favorite part.

Tier 4: Middle of the Packers

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17. Turner Field, Atlanta Braves – 14.80 (BD 15, SA 11, GP 18, FR 19, BR 4)

How do you not love Hammerin’ Hank Aaron? Turner Field is on the way out, not sure why they need to do away with it. Also, they have a Waffle House out in left field. Overall, Atlanta was extra average.

16. Citi Field, New York Mets – 14.82 (BD 16, SA 12, GP 11, FR 15, BR 16)

AKA Not Ebbets Field. It’s a great ballpark, can’t beat taking the subway to the game. Felt generic. More stuff about the Brooklyn Dodgers than the Mets though.

15. Minute Maid Park, Houston Astros – 15.35 (BD 19, SA 10, GP 6, FR 10, BR 5)

Gorgeous ballpark. Roof was open. I stood with two of my best friends beyond the outfield wall and celebrated the Royals winning on the road. Yordano and Lorenzo both wore #42 on Jackie Robinson Day.

14. Great American Ballpark, Cincinnati Reds – 15.79 (BD 12, SA 21, GP 21, FR 27, BR 29)

Opening Day festivities skyrocket this ballpark very high on the list. Great fans lined the streets for the parade. Cardinals spoiled the game 1-0 for the Redlegs.

Tier 3: The Butter Fans

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13. Coors Field, Colorado Rockies – 16.13 (BD 17, SA 22, GP 12, FR 3, BR 17)

Sat 600 feet from home plate with my youth group. Gorgeous views of the mountains. Unfortunately, the fans don’t care much about baseball, they just like being outside on a beautiful night in the city. Fair enough.

12. Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles Dodgers – 17.36 (BD 24, SA 2, GP 9, FR 1, BR 24)

Fans arrive late and leave early to beat traffic. Can’t blame them, LA traffic is rough. Otherwise this ballpark is easily in the top 10, borderline top 5. Also, Vin Scully is the best.

11. Safeco Field, Seattle Mariners – 18.12 (BD 21, SA 19, GP 7 FR 4, BR 30)

See: Houston and Colorado. (Except Seattle is perhaps the most gorgeous city on the planet.) And, like these other two, she’s a beautiful ballpark…butter fans…

Tier 2: Great Venues and Great Fans

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10. Target Field, Minnesota Twins – 19.74 (BD 18, SA 24, GP 20, FR 25, BR 22)

That limestone is terrific. Minnie and Paul shaking hands out in centerfield symbolizes a city united over baseball. Twins fans are baseball fans and a quality bunch. Downtown Minneapolis is legit too.

9. Busch Stadium, St. Louis Cardinals – 20.31 (BD 20, SA 17, GP 27, FR 23, BR 11)

Best Fans in Baseball? Eh, but 8th place ain’t bad. Love this ballpark, brick everywhere, arch out beyond centerfield. Opening Day at Busch was rainy, but still a victory.

8. Miller Park, Milwaukee Brewers – 20.90 (BD 22, SA 14, GP 22, FR 24, BR 19)

The ballpark is a retractable roof but all throwback Fenway Green in color. Best old school logo in baseball. Quality fans. Delicious Bloody Mary’s.

7. Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City Royals – 21.24 (BD 25, SA 5, GP 26, FR 18, BR 10)

This might look like a homer pick, but it’s not. Very underrated ballpark. If it was downtown it’d be right at the top. Was there from Opening Day to Game 7. Home sweet home.

6. PETCO Park, San Diego Padres – 21.77 (BD 23, SA 28, GP 8, FR 17, BR 23)

The green space beyond centerfield is the most unique space around the league. Repurposed Western Metal Supply Co. Building is beautiful. Too bad the game was awful.

Tier 1: Heaven on Earth

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5. PNC Park, Pittsburgh Pirates – 26.03 (BD 26, SA 27, GP 23, FR 28, BR 27)

Incredible view of downtown. Right on the water. Clemente. Mazeroski, Stargell. Wagner. Yellow bridges. Yellow everything. Completely packed. Last home game of the year.

4. Fenway Park, Boston Red Sox – 26.26 (BD 27, SA 29, GP 25, FR 21, BR 9)

Hard to believe that three ballparks beat out Fenway. The oldest ballpark still standing. The Green Monster is gorgeous and Yawkey Way is probably the greatest baseball stroll in America.

3. Wrigley Field, Chicago Cubs – 26.84 (BD 30, SA 30, GP 10, FR 22, BR 4)

Wrigleyville, man – 100 year anniversary season of “The Friendly Confines.” #1 ballpark, #1 surroundings. Only thing the North Side lacks is a winning team, and it’s been a long long time. Maybe Joe Maddon is the difference…

2. AT&T Park, San Francisco Giants – 27.21 (BD 28, SA 25, GP 29, FR 26, BR 14)

The Bay Area treated me well. Oakland and San Francisco were the two best games I saw. Won a $50 Levi’s gift card when rookie Tyler Colvin launched a homer into McCovey Cove. If you go to AT&T Park, I highly recommend the Arcade seats.

And the winner is…

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1. Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore Orioles – 28.02 (BD 29, SA 23, GP 28, FR 30, BR 26)

Congratulations, Orioles fans. You’ve made it big. The ballpark that changed the architecture game. Since 1992 retro parks have been the name of design game. B&O Railroad building is the perfect homerun target that no one has ever hit outside of Ken Griffey Jr. in the All Star Game. Down to the open air press box, every single cranny is modelled after ballparks from the past.

There you go. Feel free to tell me where I got it right but more likely where I got it wrong. Again, this is just my first stab at these rankings, you never know how things might change between now and my book release.

-apc.

* – Okay, obviously Independence Day is the right answer. Jurassic Park is a distant second. Maybe Tom Hanks would’ve been a better option here.

Fenway, Wrigley…then where?

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If you could travel to three MLB ballparks that you’ve never been to before, which would you go to and why? 

Make a mental note of your top three. Go ahead. I’ll wait.

Okay now I’m going to see if I can predict your answers.

This is the question I’ve been asking my friends a lot lately, and I’ve noticed a theme as the question continues to get asked. They don’t always say the same three stadiums, but the consistent theme goes something like this:

  1. Either Fenway Park or Wrigley Field.
  2. Usually the other one: Fenway or Wrigley. But potentially Yankee Stadium, Camden Yards, Dodger Stadium or AT&T Park.
  3. Always a mysterious wild card.

It’s almost comical how consistent the answers have been. Obviously, everyone wants to hit the historic venues, but they also consistently include a curveball based on mostly curiosity and very little knowledge of the stadium. There’s no real reason for the interest, they’re just intrigued. It’s mysterious to them, but they feel pulled for some reason.

So how am I doing so far?

Were two of your three choices in the first two points?

The most common response I get for the third one: Safeco Field, home of the Seattle Mariners.

There’s something intriguing about the Mariners for a lot of fans. Seattle isn’t anywhere close to any other MLB team – the nearest are Oakland and San Francisco, 800 miles away – and I think people just mostly forget about it. TV networks are way more likely to show a Dodgers or Giants or Angels game than a Mariners game, and even if they’re on late, nobody on the east coast is going to stay up until 1 or 2AM to watch.

I wonder if Felix Hernandez gets less coverage than he deserves because he’s on the Mariners. I wonder what will happen now that Robinson Cano is there.

Seattle is actually closer to Tokyo than it is to Miami.

Okay. No it’s not. But raise your hand if you kinda believed it at first. I actually had to go look it up myself – Tokyo is 4800 miles away and Miami is only 3300 miles – but the point is that I wasn’t even sure. It feels like a different country to some of us.

Who picked Seattle? Anybody?

Let’s keep going.

Another one I get a lot: PNC Park, home of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Now this one has an obvious explanation: the Roberto Clemente Bridge.

Every time there’s a Game Break on whatever Fox Sports affiliate you watch, there are only a few stadiums that truly stand out immediately. PNC Park is one of them. Every highlight has that giant yellow bridge in the background, and it sets it apart from the rest of them.

Besides, deep down, I think we all like the Pirates because we all sorta feel sorry for them. Until last year, they’ve been so bad for so long that it’s difficult to have any negative feelings about them anymore.

Ok, be honest, how am I doing? Was that it? PNC?

Imma regular David Copperfield, amiright?

The third answer I get a lot: Minute Maid Park, home of the Houston Astros.

The reasoning behind this one is similar to PNC Park, I think: it’s immediately recognizable on TV because of the train track that runs across the left field exterior wall and that goofy little hill in center field.

It’s intriguing. Not that anyone wants to see the Astros play anymore – the team lost 111 games last year – but there’s something about it that speaks to us.

Welp. How’d I do? Did I get all three?

Okay, I’m sure there are tons of you who picked Citizens Bank Park in Philly or Busch Stadium in St. Louis or Kauffman Stadium in KC or the freshly named Globe Life Park in Arlington. There’s no wrong answer here.*

* – Except Oakland or Miami. Those could be considered wrong answers, actually.

What I’m getting at is this: the primary destinations of interest are compelling for cognitive reasons. By that I mean, we know we want to go there because we have knowledge of the histories involved. We know that Fenway and Wrigley are the oldest, so we know they need to be at the top of our list. We know that the Yankees, Dodgers, Orioles and Giants have history and traditions that we ought to experience.

But then something in us wants to solve a mystery or quench our curiosity. Our imagination somehow kicks in by the third answer and completes the list with a quirky third option. It leaves open the possibility for adventure or a solved riddle. We’ve seen something that caught our interest on TV and we want to investigate.

So maybe the question to ask is not whether I was able to correctly guess your top three ballparks you want to visit. Maybe what I’m attempting to solve is how you constructed your top three. I’m guessing I at least got that part right.

All that to say, what three would you pick? Which three ballparks are you most interested in visiting?

-apc.

Ballpark Tour 2014: The Itinerary

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A couple days ago, I broke the news that I am writing a book. I’ll be spending the 2014 Major League Baseball season traveling the country visiting all 30 MLB ballparks. This experience, I hope, will provide a skeleton outline of my book, and the countless stories will be the backbone. For more information on my project and why I’m doing it, check out my Kickstarter and consider helping me fundraise by pre-pre-ordering the book before 3/1.

So this trip. Its going to be nuts. Even now that the Kickstarter has launched and that I’m under contract with a publisher, I’m struggling to comprehend the fact that I’ll be traveling to 30 different cities within 6 months.* It seems impossible, yet I look at my calendar and there it is. All 30 cities in one MLB season. It looks foolproof and easy on paper…not unlike my fantasy football team this year. Hopefully this pans out better than that did.

* – Throw a trip to Myanmar in there too. I’ll be traveling there in March for two weeks with my CBTS seminary cohort taking classes at the Myanmar Institute of Theology. Yep, that’s MIT.

Want to hear something even crazier? When I first had this idea, I wanted to do all 30 of these games in 30 days. It’s doable, and it’s been done before. But as I thought about the writing process and I pictured myself coming home exhausted, sleeping for eighteen consecutive hours, waking up and trying to write a book…and spending most of my time asking myself, “wait, where was Game 6 again? Oh yeah, San Diego. And who were they playing? Oh gosh, maybe Washington? Colorado? Dodgers? Shoot I don’t remember.”

So I wised up. And I spread it out over the entire season. Here’s a look at my current itinerary:

  • March 31: STL @ CIN
  • April 11: WAS @ ATL
  • April 14: SEA @ TEX 
  • April 15: KC @ HOU
  • April 16: NYM @ ARI
  • April 17: COL @ SD
  • May 7: NYY @ LAA
  • May 8: SF @ LAD 
  • May 10: KC @ SEA 
  • May 11: WAS @ OAK 
  • May 12: ATL @ SF 
  • May 18: BAL @ KC
  • June 3: ARI @ COL
  • June 25: OAK @ NYM 
  • June 26: MIA @ PHI
  • June 27: BOS @ NYY 
  • June 30: CHC @ BOS
  • July 1: COL @ WAS 
  • July 2: TEX @ BAL
  • July 18: TB @ MIN
  • Aug 5: BOS @ STL 
  • Aug 6: TEX @ CWS 
  • Aug 7: SF @ MIL 
  • Aug 8: TB @ CHC
  • Sept 17: NYY @ TB 
  • Sept 18: WAS @ MIA
  • Sept 21: MIL @ PIT
  • Sept 22: SEA @ TOR
  • Sept 23: CWS @ DET 
  • Sept 24: KC @ CLE

(It’s okay if you just scrolled through all that quickly without really looking at it. I understand.)

Not only will spreading it out make the entire project more manageable, but I imagine the storylines will be way more enjoyable as well. I’ll get to follow teams from start to finish. If this was the 2013 season, I’d remember how terrible the Dodgers were early, and how Don Mattingly was on the hot seat for his job, but then the Human Firecracker, Yasiel Puig, showed up and Hanley Ramirez got healthy and the Dodgers went on a tear and became one of the NL’s top teams. Storylines like that.

By spreading it out, the entire season comes better info focus. By zooming out, the stories become larger and the entire journey is able to gain more momentum.

The toughest part of creating the itinerary is maneuvering through the MLB schedule itself. On any given day of the week, only half the teams are playing at home. Throw in off-days and an All-Star break, and there’s something like a 40% chance* that any given team is actually playing in the city between Opening Day and the end of the season.

* – Just did the math…between March 31 and September 28 there are 210 days and each team only has 81 home games. Which makes it a 38.6% chance the team is in town. Basically, I nailed it.

So where to begin my scheduling?

Obviously I have to take my own personal schedule into account – I’m still working full-time and taking classes full-time through May and beginning again in August – but the best place to begin, I discovered, was finding the times where nearby teams were in town at the same time. I clustered teams together into a few geographical groups…

Chicago +1: Cubs, White Sox. Brewers
The Californians: Dodgers, Angels, Giants, Athletics, Padres
The East Coast: Yankees, Mets, Phillies, Nationals, Orioles, Red Sox
Florida: Rays, Marlins
Lake Erie: Tigers, Indians, Blue Jays, Pirates
Texas: Astros, Rangers
Middle of Nowhere*: Mariners, Rockies, Braves, Diamondbacks, Minnesota
Missouri…ish: Cardinals, Royals, Cincinnati

* – also a terrific Hanson album. #mmmbop

I knew I wanted to go to Cincinnati for Opening Day – the Reds have a long history of doing Opening Day (more on that later), and it served as the “official” OD location each year until recently. And since I live in Kansas City and St. Louis is only a few hours away, the “Missourish” section was easiest and most flexible. I decided to begin by finding the dates for the most difficult trips first.

One thing I discovered very early: cities with multiple MLB teams don’t schedule them at the same time. In order to hit two teams in one trip, I had to catch the last game of one series and the first game of the next. For Chicago, having Milwaukee in the mix, that was the most difficult task. I found my answer on August 6-8: the last game of the White Sox series, a Thursday afternoon game up in Milwaukee, and the first game of a Cubs series. Book it.

Then I checked out SF/OAK & LAD/LAA. Found both sets ending and beginning series right by each other in early May. Stuck a quick flight to Seattle in the middle…book it.

Then I went searching for NYY/NYM & BAL/WAS. Found the former in late June, the latter on the first two days of July. I squeezed Philly and Boston in between…book it.

I had a couple different possibilities for the Lake Erie group. I could hit the west side cities – Cleveland and Detroit – as a part of the Chicago trio. I could hit Toronto and Pittsburgh in between the New York and Baltimore/DC sections too. There was some flexibility there.

Then I looked at the teams I was dealing with and realized the right answer: I need to visit these games in September. As a fan of both the Cardinals and the Royals, I’ve watched the AL and NL Central compete over the last few years and know it will be a dogfight for the last two wild card games – Cleveland*, Detroit, Pittsburgh…and if Toronto can have a bounce back year anything like last year’s Red Sox did, it should be the perfect storm of drama leading up to the playoffs. And with all four teams playing home games the second to last week of the season, that’s where I want to be as the season is winding down….book it.

* – Especially if my Royals are fighting for a spot too, that last game in Cleveland could get pretty exciting.

Then I noticed that Tampa and Miami were playing back to back just a couple days before the Lake Erie tour…book it.

Here’s something funny: it took me months – months! – to remember that i was already going to Denver in June with my youth group. Duh! Sure enough, the Rockies were in town the exact days we were going to be there. Guess what students?! I just figured out what our evening excursion is going to be on June 3…book it.

So that leaves the two Texas teams, 60% of the Middle of Nowheres and the Padres. What do I do with a smörgåsbord like that? Solution: bunch em all together, get em out of the way early, and move from east to west so I’m gaining hours and not losing them.

I found a stretch in April that worked out almost perfectly: Atlanta to Arlington to Houston to Phoenix to San Diego. Six days. Five games. Book it.

That just leaves Minnesota.

And I am NOT going there until it is nice and toasty this summer. Did you guys hear it was -36F there yesterday morning?! Why does anyone live there?! I just don’t understand how that’s possible. But wait a minute…where’s the All-Star Game this year?

Minnesota.

Ooooooo. So tempting. We’ll see if I can make that happen, but if not, the Twins are for sure in town the weekend immediately after the ASG so that can serve as a safety net regardless of if I can figure out a way to finagle my way into the ASG or not. Also, I’m still uncertain whether going to the All-Star Game at Target Field actually counts – it completes the ballpark requirement, but I won’t even see the Twins play! So I might end up spending a few days there and hitting both just to make sure I’m covered.

Plus the closest IKEA is in Minneapolis*, so….book it.

* – That is, until September 2014, when we finally get one in Kansas City! I hear we’re getting color television soon too. And Creed was just here a few months ago. Look out world.

So there you have it. The itinerary split up into major sections…

1. The Smörgåsbord (April 11-17)
2. The West Coast (May 7-13)
3. The East Coast (June 25-July 2)
4. The Chicagoans +1 (August 6-8)
5. Florida & Lake Erie (September 17-24)

…with a few single game additions in between…

1. Opening Day, Cincinnati (March 31)
2. Dressed to the Nines Day*, Kansas City (May 18)
3. Youth Group, Colorado (June 3)
4. All-Star Week, Minnesota (July 15&18)
5. World Series Rematch*, St. Louis (Aug 5)

* – More on these later. For now, you can get some more info in these two places: Dressed to the Nines Day on Facebook and this Instagram post from before Game 4.

And when you put it all together it looks a lot like a Table of Contents. Interesting.

1. Opening Day, Cincinnati (March 31)
2. The Smörgåsbord (April 11-17)

3. The West Coast (May 7-13)
4. Dressed to the Nines Day, Kansas City (May 18)
5. Youth Group, Colorado (June 3)

6. The East Coast (June 25-July 2)
7. All-Star Week, Minnesota (July 15&18)
8. World Series Rematch, St. Louis (Aug 5)

9. The Chicagoans +1 (August 6-8)
10. Florida + Lake Erie (September 17-24)

So there you have it. My itinerary and how it came about.

It may not stay all the same. (Read: it probably won’t all stay the same.) There may be opportunities along the way to hit games earlier or later than planned. There also might be a missed flight or flat tire or death or dismemberment that may throw a wrench in the whole thing…sorta like my fantasy football team when half the team gets injured. Things will happen outside my control, and I hope those make for some of the best moments in the whole book.

Or, as theologian Jurgen Moltmann once said, “The road emerged only as I walked it.”

-apc.

PS – Thanks to everyone who has pledged to this project so far – I’m 17% of the way to my goal in just 2 days – and thanks in advance to those of you who are going to follow this link and help me out by pre-pre-ordering the book.

Image cred: http://moneyqanda.com/major-league-baseball-stadiums/