Game 20: Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Ah yes. The final piece of the Ballpark Tour 2014 post series.

I was able to post about 27 of the 30 ballparks I visited in 2014. Three of them were just too much to write about in the moment: Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park and Oriole Park at Camden Yards. I don’t have time right now to post a lengthy post game report as I did the others, but dragging/dropping my photos takes next to no time at all.

So here you go. My photo post from my trip to Baltimore.

Commencing photos now.

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My favorite ballpark. Amazing tour. Major rain delay. “Here we go, O’s” can sound remarkably like “Here we go, Royals” if you say it fast enough. We got free shirts.

-apc.

Game 17: Yankee Stadium

I posted in my book update that three ballparks along my tour were too meaty to do justice in a postgame blog. And while I didn’t have time to write about them then, it takes no time at all to upload a photo post from each of them. This is the first of those three. The other two are Fenway Park and Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Commencing photos now.

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Still feels weird to look at myself wearing a Yankees cap. Stay tuned for more on my Yankee Stadium experience when the book comes out next year.

-apc.

Book Update

Can you believe it’s nearly baseball season?! I can’t. As much as I bemoan the winter months, I’m shocked at how quickly we’ve pushed through them. Pitchers and catchers are reporting to camp! It’s crazy how fast the offseason has blitzed by. It’s as if the 2014 MLB season lasted a month longer than normal here in KC…

Anyway. I want to update you all on where I am in terms of my book.

The writing is ongoing. I’ve had a couple setbacks, but I also seem to get more and more excited daily as my vision for this book has taken its final shape. Let’s start with the setbacks and end with the exciting bits.

The first bit of bad news is that my publisher went out of business. The House Studio was a part of the Nazarene Publishing House and had to close their doors at the beginning of December. I held out hope that they might re-form under a new group and retain my project, but alas, that’s not the case. So I’m back on the prowl for a publisher. I have a couple leads, and self-publishing is always a last resort option. I figure I’ll let that play out when I’ve completed my first draft and can submit it around to various publications. We’ll see what works out – this could end up being a good thing in the end. I’m hopeful.

The other bit of bad news is probably more neutral news. I’m in my final semester of classes in seminary and I’ve discovered that as my classes have gotten tougher, my workload has increased and my time to write a book on the side has decreased. The book has to take a backseat to my academics. Seminary is hard work. Imagine that. I call this “neutral news” because with every class I attend, book I read and paper I write I’m gaining more and more insight into themes this book will revolve around. So while it’s a slight delay in the writing process – I’m about 6 months behind schedule – it’s leading to better content on the back end, so I feel great about taking my time. I don’t want to throw together some sloppy piece of work. Writing is an extension of self, and I want something I’ll be proud of in the end, so bear with me!

Okay that’s the bad/neutral news.

Here’s the good news.

First, the ballpark tour was an incredible success. I had no rainouts or missed flights or delays in my schedule, which is a borderline miracle in itself. I’ve never experienced a busier, more exhausting or more exciting season of my life than the 2014 baseball season, and I have all of you to thank. I also got to share experiences with old friends and new friends across the nation (and Toronto!), which was an incredible blessing. I think a lot of my emotions surrounding the Royals’ World Series loss was due to the realization that not only was the season over, but it was the end of a long string of wonderful relational moments as well.

In the midst of my travels, I experienced how difficult it is to be a beat reporter in baseball. I was able to post 27 of the 30 blogs as I went along. The only three I couldn’t complete in time were the Yankees, Red Sox and Orioles which felt too meaty to do justice in a quick postgame blog. They’ve been placed on the “you’ll have to wait till the book is out to read about those games” list.

Which brings me to my next piece of good news: my outline is finished and a handful of chapters have already been completed. My outline for the book consists of all 30 MLB ballparks and a spiritual insight discovered in each place…and an October Epilogue! When my classes wrap up in May, my writing calendar opens up completely to this project, which is going to be SO refreshing. A draft is due to my seminary by December in order to graduate next May, so I can pretty safely say that’s about when the book will end up coming out as well: Spring Training 2016.

So there you go. An update on where my project stands for those keeping track at home. Believe me, I wish I could get this out of my brain and into your hands sooner. Thanks for your patience and for your continued support!

-apc.

Ballpark Tour 2014: Panoramas

I took SO MANY panoramas in 2014! I took at least one – often dozens – at each ballpark on my Tour this season. This series marks the best of those panoramas at each game. They have all been amateurishly edited and cropped for consistency.

All in all, I’m very pleased with how these turned out. Again, something magical is happening in the Bay Area, or maybe that’s just where my pano skills reached pro form. I’m also pleased with the shots of Citizens Bank Park and US Cellular Field.

I am a bit disappointed with myself that I didn’t plan ahead better for this series. I could’ve taken them all from the same location in every park or at least waited until other fans arrived and the game was going on – I feel like about half of these feature the grounds crew. Oh well. Too late. Spilled milk.

In case you missed past posts – check out my original Tour Itinerary and the first draft of my Ballpark Rankingus. Might be worth the read if ballparks are your thing.

Okay, enough writing. You didn’t come here to read words, you came to look at photos which are with 1,000 words each. So here’s 30,000 words on the 30 MLB ballparks in order my visit starting with Cincinnati on Opening Day. Enjoy.

Note: the date/name goes with the pano below it. It gets confusing after a bit of scrolling.

March 31: Great American Ballpark – Cincinnati Reds

Great American Ballpark

April 4: Kauffman Stadium – Kansas City Royals

Kauffman Stadium

April 7: Busch Stadium – St. Louis Cardinals

Busch Stadium

April 13: Turner Field – Atlanta Braves

Turner Field

April 14: Globe Life Park at Arlington – Texas Rangers

Globe Life Park at Arlington

April 15: Minute Maid Park – Houston Astros

Minute Maid Park

April 16: Chase Field – Arizona Diamondbacks

Chase Field

April 17: PETCO Park – San Diego Padres

PETCO Park

May 8: Dodger Stadium – Los Angeles Dodgers

Dodger Stadium

May 9: Safeco Field – Seattle Mariners

Safeco Field

May 10: O.Co Coliseum – Oakland Athletics

O.Co Coliseum

May 12: AT&T Park – San Francisco Giants

AT&T Park

June 3: Coors Field – Colorado Rockies

Coors Field

June 11: Angel Stadium – Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Angel Stadium

June 25: Citi Field – New York Mets

Citi Field

June 26: Citizens Bank Park – Philadelphia Phillies

Citizens Bank Park

June 27: Yankee Stadium – New York Yankees

Tankee Stadium

June 30: Fenway Park – Boston Red Sox

Fenway Park

July 1: Nationals Park – Washington Nationals

Nationals Park

July 2: Oriole Park at Camden Yards – Baltimore Orioles

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

August 6: US Cellular Field – Chicago White Sox

US Cellular Field

August 7: Miller Park – Milwaukee Brewers

Miller Park

August 7: Wrigley Field – Chicago Cubs

Wrigley Field

September 3: Target Field – Minnesota Twins

Target Field

September 17: Tropicana Field – Tampa Bay Rays

Tropicana Field

September 18: Marlins Park – Miami Marlins

Marlins Park

September 21: PNC Park – Pittsburgh Pirates

PNC Park

September 22: Rogers Centre – Toronto Blue Jays

Rogers Centre

September 23: Comerica Park – Detroit Tigers

Comerica Park

September 24: Progressive Field – Cleveland Indians

Progressive Field

So many memories from a crazy summer. I’m excited to share them with you when my book comes out next year.

I’m trying to figure out what I should do with this collection beyond this post. Probably a coffee table book or something. Let me know what ideas you might have.

-apc.

APC’s MLB Ballpark Rankings

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After touring all 30 MLB ballparks this summer, I get asked almost daily which one was my favorite, and it’s always so difficult to say. I loved them all in one way or another. Even the ones at the bottom of the list had bright spots that I appreciated about them. Even Tampa.

Besides, how am I supposed to pick ONE favorite park? That’s like asking me to pick a favorite fruit or Jeff Goldblum* movie.

How does one compare Fenway Park and PNC Park? Or Safeco Field and Dodger Stadium? Or Marlins Park and US Cellular Field? These pairings have very little in common, but yet they each appear right next to one another on my initial rankings. Do I favor Boston’s history over Pittsburgh’s downtown vista? Do I favor Seattle’ retractable roof over LA’s classic 50’s flare? And how does one even attempt to compare Marlins Park to any other ballpark in the game, let alone perhaps the most basic concrete cookie-cutter park in existence?

Some gorgeous ballparks have terrible teams (San Diego or Colorado, for example) or lousy fans (New York or Los Angeles) while some really ugly ballparks field a championship contending team and have great fans (Oakland, for example).

It’s not an easy ranking to do, and the “right” answer isn’t immediately clear.

What was clear was that I was going to need to put together some sort of algorithm in order to effectively rank these ballparks. I needed to land on some systematic approach to ranking various categories from 1-30 and assign point values for each. I was also going to need to give certain categories more weight than others.

This is still all completely subjective, but it gives me a little bit more to lean on besides a purely arbitrary ranking. Here are the initial 5 categories that I’ve utilized to rank. I should add that this is NOT my “official” list – just a first attempt mock up. Here we go…

  • Ballpark Design (BD): 65% – This category should obviously hold the most weight, so I’ve given it nearly 2/3 of the score. This category includes architecture, views, features, and history. If you push me hard enough, I may pull out the history and re-rank with that as a separate category. We’ll see.
  • Surrounding Area (SA): 15% – If I learned one thing about ballparks this summer it’s this: the best ballparks are usually downtown, and they’re usually surrounded by some spectacular spots to hang out and grab some local food and a beer before or after the game. If it’s nothing but parking lot – the experience isn’t nearly as great. This category also includes transportation to and from the ballpark.
  • Gameplay (GP): 10% – I also acknowledge that my rankings are going to be based primarily on how much fun the single game I attended was. Rather than try to ignore this and eliminate the bias, I’m choosing to include it in my rankings. It’s not a significant percentage, but it’s enough to bump Oakland as high as #26.
  • Fan Rank (FR): 8% – Every city has diehard fans, but not all of them enhance the experience at the ballpark. This is probably the category that will get me the most flack.
  • Beer Rank (BR): 2% – The Washington Post did a survey on which ballparks had the best micro-brewery beer selection and ranked them 1-30. I haven’t tweaked these numbers at all, they’re directly from the article linked above. I’m not sure if 2% was enough to influence any one ballpark over another, but it’s a crucial part of the stadium experience.

I need to probably add a history, city, and food category, but this will suffice for now. Let me know what other ideas you have. For now, here’s what I ended up with for my initial results. First place received 30 points in each category. Last place received 1 point. I’ve broken it down into 7 tiers…

Tier 7: I Don’t Care If I Ever Get Back

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30. Tropicana Field, Tampa Bay Rays – 2.55 (BD 1, SA 8, FR 2, GP 4, BR 7)

The only thing I liked about Tampa was the old man I kept score with during the last two innings who kept dropping f-bombs. He’s the only reason they didn’t finish dead last in Fan Rank.

29. Globe Life Park at Arlington, Texas Rangers – 3.91 (BD 3, SA 6, GP 1, FR 9, BR 12)

Freezing cold game. Rangers got pounded. No views. Like playing ball in an ugly castle courtyard.

28. Marlins Park, Miami Marlins – 5.97 (BD 6, SA 7, GP 3, FR 7, BR 8)

Modern design, unlike any others, but it just didn’t feel like baseball. The game was so boring that I left my seat to go find a TV with the K-State/Auburn game on it.

Tier 6: The Bronx Bummers

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27. US Cellular Field, Chicago White Sox – 7.25 (BD 4, SA 13, GP 14, FR 11, BR 21)

The last ballpark built in the concrete cookie-cutter era of park design. Very basic and unexciting. Good beer selection though and you can’t beat the L train dropping you off right by the park.

26. O.Co Coliseum, Oakland Athletics – 7.33 (BD 2, SA, 3, GP 30, FR 29, BR 13)

One of the ugliest ballparks in the game, and the only one that can really give The Trop a run for its money. This was the best game on the tour though – walk off double and on field fireworks after the game. Impressive tailgating and dedicated fans too.

25. Angels Stadium, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 8.28 (BD 11, SA 1, GP 2, FR 6, BR 15)

Right around the corner from Disneyland, this ballpark felt like an amusement park. Took 2 hours to drive there in LA traffic. The parking lots surrounding it aren’t lit well at all. All that, and they got torched by the Athletics.

24. Yankee Stadium, New York Yankees – 9.27 (BD 7, SA 20, GP 13, FR 5, BR 1)

Impressive? Sure. The monuments and history are certainly something. Otherwise, Yankees Stadium wasn’t all I had expected it to be. It’s too big for baseball. Big fan of the neverending popcorn bucket. Worst beer selection in baseball.

Tier 5: The Forgettables

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23. Chase Field, Arizona Diamondbacks – 10.21 (BD 9, SA 18, GP 5, FR 14, BR 2)

Cavernous interior space. Swimming pool beyond centerfield. Downtown Phoenix is pretty cool, and the fans seem pretty committed for such a young franchise. This might rank higher if the roof was open.

22. Nationals Park, Washington Natinoals – 10.75 (BD 8, SA 15, GP 19, FR 13, BR 18)

Humid. Woof. Fans were making up new chants – even if those chants were basically the J-E-T-S chant with 50% different letters. Stephen Strasburg pitched a gem while I was there. Is there a time of year when D.C. isn’t ultra sweaty?

21. Progressive Field, Cleveland Indians – 10.91 (BD 5, SA 26, GP 16, FR 20, BR 28)

Awkward interior dimensions, distinct 90s ballpark vibe, and not in a good way. Passionate fans. Downtown Cleveland is super cool.

20. Rogers Centre, Toronto Blue Jays – 11.36 (BD 10, SA 16, GP 17, FR 8, BR 6)

Toronto is basically Canadian Chicago, and that’s a good thing. Another “wish the roof had been open” ballpark. This game was in the middle of the pennant race against Seattle, so it was extra rewarding to watch the Jays pile on the runs.

19. Comerica Park, Detroit Tigers – 13.08 (BD 13, SA 9, GP 15, FR 16, BR 25)

Conflicting game watching the Tigers win and move one step closer to clinching the AL Central over the Royals. Downtown Detriot is not great, but Comerica itself was a very nice space. Curmudgeony upper deck vendors too.

18. Citizens Bank Park, Philadelphia Phillies – 13.46 (BD 14, SA 4, GP 24, FR 12, BR 20)

Awesome game. Fourteen inning Chase Utley walkoff. Beautiful ballpark. Delicious hot dog. Ivy covered batters eye was my favorite part.

Tier 4: Middle of the Packers

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17. Turner Field, Atlanta Braves – 14.80 (BD 15, SA 11, GP 18, FR 19, BR 4)

How do you not love Hammerin’ Hank Aaron? Turner Field is on the way out, not sure why they need to do away with it. Also, they have a Waffle House out in left field. Overall, Atlanta was extra average.

16. Citi Field, New York Mets – 14.82 (BD 16, SA 12, GP 11, FR 15, BR 16)

AKA Not Ebbets Field. It’s a great ballpark, can’t beat taking the subway to the game. Felt generic. More stuff about the Brooklyn Dodgers than the Mets though.

15. Minute Maid Park, Houston Astros – 15.35 (BD 19, SA 10, GP 6, FR 10, BR 5)

Gorgeous ballpark. Roof was open. I stood with two of my best friends beyond the outfield wall and celebrated the Royals winning on the road. Yordano and Lorenzo both wore #42 on Jackie Robinson Day.

14. Great American Ballpark, Cincinnati Reds – 15.79 (BD 12, SA 21, GP 21, FR 27, BR 29)

Opening Day festivities skyrocket this ballpark very high on the list. Great fans lined the streets for the parade. Cardinals spoiled the game 1-0 for the Redlegs.

Tier 3: The Butter Fans

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13. Coors Field, Colorado Rockies – 16.13 (BD 17, SA 22, GP 12, FR 3, BR 17)

Sat 600 feet from home plate with my youth group. Gorgeous views of the mountains. Unfortunately, the fans don’t care much about baseball, they just like being outside on a beautiful night in the city. Fair enough.

12. Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles Dodgers – 17.36 (BD 24, SA 2, GP 9, FR 1, BR 24)

Fans arrive late and leave early to beat traffic. Can’t blame them, LA traffic is rough. Otherwise this ballpark is easily in the top 10, borderline top 5. Also, Vin Scully is the best.

11. Safeco Field, Seattle Mariners – 18.12 (BD 21, SA 19, GP 7 FR 4, BR 30)

See: Houston and Colorado. (Except Seattle is perhaps the most gorgeous city on the planet.) And, like these other two, she’s a beautiful ballpark…butter fans…

Tier 2: Great Venues and Great Fans

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10. Target Field, Minnesota Twins – 19.74 (BD 18, SA 24, GP 20, FR 25, BR 22)

That limestone is terrific. Minnie and Paul shaking hands out in centerfield symbolizes a city united over baseball. Twins fans are baseball fans and a quality bunch. Downtown Minneapolis is legit too.

9. Busch Stadium, St. Louis Cardinals – 20.31 (BD 20, SA 17, GP 27, FR 23, BR 11)

Best Fans in Baseball? Eh, but 8th place ain’t bad. Love this ballpark, brick everywhere, arch out beyond centerfield. Opening Day at Busch was rainy, but still a victory.

8. Miller Park, Milwaukee Brewers – 20.90 (BD 22, SA 14, GP 22, FR 24, BR 19)

The ballpark is a retractable roof but all throwback Fenway Green in color. Best old school logo in baseball. Quality fans. Delicious Bloody Mary’s.

7. Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City Royals – 21.24 (BD 25, SA 5, GP 26, FR 18, BR 10)

This might look like a homer pick, but it’s not. Very underrated ballpark. If it was downtown it’d be right at the top. Was there from Opening Day to Game 7. Home sweet home.

6. PETCO Park, San Diego Padres – 21.77 (BD 23, SA 28, GP 8, FR 17, BR 23)

The green space beyond centerfield is the most unique space around the league. Repurposed Western Metal Supply Co. Building is beautiful. Too bad the game was awful.

Tier 1: Heaven on Earth

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5. PNC Park, Pittsburgh Pirates – 26.03 (BD 26, SA 27, GP 23, FR 28, BR 27)

Incredible view of downtown. Right on the water. Clemente. Mazeroski, Stargell. Wagner. Yellow bridges. Yellow everything. Completely packed. Last home game of the year.

4. Fenway Park, Boston Red Sox – 26.26 (BD 27, SA 29, GP 25, FR 21, BR 9)

Hard to believe that three ballparks beat out Fenway. The oldest ballpark still standing. The Green Monster is gorgeous and Yawkey Way is probably the greatest baseball stroll in America.

3. Wrigley Field, Chicago Cubs – 26.84 (BD 30, SA 30, GP 10, FR 22, BR 4)

Wrigleyville, man – 100 year anniversary season of “The Friendly Confines.” #1 ballpark, #1 surroundings. Only thing the North Side lacks is a winning team, and it’s been a long long time. Maybe Joe Maddon is the difference…

2. AT&T Park, San Francisco Giants – 27.21 (BD 28, SA 25, GP 29, FR 26, BR 14)

The Bay Area treated me well. Oakland and San Francisco were the two best games I saw. Won a $50 Levi’s gift card when rookie Tyler Colvin launched a homer into McCovey Cove. If you go to AT&T Park, I highly recommend the Arcade seats.

And the winner is…

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1. Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore Orioles – 28.02 (BD 29, SA 23, GP 28, FR 30, BR 26)

Congratulations, Orioles fans. You’ve made it big. The ballpark that changed the architecture game. Since 1992 retro parks have been the name of design game. B&O Railroad building is the perfect homerun target that no one has ever hit outside of Ken Griffey Jr. in the All Star Game. Down to the open air press box, every single cranny is modelled after ballparks from the past.

There you go. Feel free to tell me where I got it right but more likely where I got it wrong. Again, this is just my first stab at these rankings, you never know how things might change between now and my book release.

-apc.

* – Okay, obviously Independence Day is the right answer. Jurassic Park is a distant second. Maybe Tom Hanks would’ve been a better option here.

Game 30: Progressive Field, Cleveland

“So, what team do you play for?”

“The Indians.”

“Here in Cleveland? I didn’t know they still had a team?”

“Yeah, we have uniforms and everything, it’s great.”

Is there a sports movie out there that better resonates with the culture of a franchise than Major League does for the Cleveland Indians?

Rookie of the Year is about the Cubs, sure, but it’s a kid playing baseball and that’s not realistic. Same with Little Big League with the Twins only it’s a kid manager instead. And The Sandlot is about a group of kids, only one of which makes it to the pros and it only shows one play of him stealing home for the Dodgers.

The Kevin Costner Trio – Bull Durham, For Love of the Game and Field of Dreams – don’t chronicle an MLB season either, each for different reasons. Bull Durham is about a minor league team; For Love of the Game centers on one specific game at the end of a season; and Field of Dreams focuses on the 1919 Chicago Black Sox and a corn field in Iowa.

Other films are terrific, but don’t have anything to do with an MLB franchise: A League of Their Own, The Natural, The Rookie, for example. All great films, but only The Rookie has anything to do with the MLB and Dennis Quaid only faces a single batter and throws three pitches.

There’s also Fever Pitch……moving on.

The only two that you might be able to argue are Moneyball and Angels in the Outfield. Both chronicle an entire season with an actual MLB team. Moneyball certainly resonates, but the fact that it is based entirely on a true story and came out well after the events took place makes it less compelling for fans. Angels in the Outfield is fantastic. Danny Glover and a young Joseph-Gordon Levitt headline the against-all-odds-bad-franchise-miraculously-turned-winners plot line. It’s close, but not quite.

And then there is Major League.

Again, the point I’m making is not that Major League is the best movie ever. What I’m saying is no other baseball movie resonates with a team more than the Cleveland Indians.

The 1989 flick features Tom Berenger as washed up catcher Jake Taylor, Charlie Sheen as California penal system product Ricky “Wild Thing” Vaughn, and Wesley Snipes as speedster Willie Mays Hayes. The clubhouse of misfits is predicted by every major newspaper to finished dead last. Naturally, they beat the Yankees in the last game of the season to finish in first.

The reason it resonates? Obviously there are many.

First, the city of Cleveland is very prominent. The movie is actually shot at Municipal Stadium in Cleveland – the “Mistake by the Lake” as they call it. By contrast, Angels in the Outfield wasn’t even shot in California, but at Camden Yards in Baltimore instead.

The Indians go form being nobodys to the talk of the cities. The movie continually cuts to the people of Cleveland themselves left to comment on the team. The construction workers comment, “Who are these f—ing guys?” and the grounds crew workers comment, “They’re sh—y,” and the face-painted Wahoos in the bleachers are continually called back as a way to remind us why baseball exists at all: it’s for the fans. Major League does a great job incorporating the fans and the city into the script.

Secondly, it’s not true, but it also isn’t inaccurate.

The whole “terrible for over four decades” piece is spot on. The last World Series victory for the Indians was in 1948 – 41 years before the movie came out. They still haven’t won it all since then either giving the Tribe the second longest draught behind the Chicago Cubs.

The whole “our ballpark is crumbling” piece is also spot on. Municipal Stadium was the worst. It was built in the 1930s as a multipurpose prototype. It held over 70,000 fans and was rarely, if ever, full. Even high traffic games of 30,000+ were half empty. It was billed to be Cleveland’s version of Yankee Stadium. Turned out to be cold and breezy right next to Lake Erie. It also had an asbestos roof.

It was so bad that during the 30s and 40s – back when the Indians were still competitive – they would play their weekday games over at tiny League Park, despite it being a much older venue (1891), and would only play at Municipal on weekends.

Tribe fans never knew a time of winning at Municipal Stadium. It was a venue synonymous with losing.

The city of Cleveland recently renovated the old League Park site that had been just sitting there since it closed in 1946. League Park hosted players such as Bob Feller, Satchel Paige and Cy Young. Babe Ruth hit his 500th home run there. The only unassisted triple play in World Series history was turned there.

The dimensions were awkward because the neighbors wouldn’t sell their property: 505 ft to straight away centerfield and 290 ft to right. To eliminate the number of home runs, they installed a 40 foot wall with a 20 foot chain link fence on top. A sixty foot wall. Crazy.

Some pics…
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The whole “going from worst to first” piece isn’t far fetched either. Because by 1995 they were playing in the World Series. They went again in 1997. They won the division 5 of 6 years between 1995 and 2000. Young players like Kenny Lofton, Carlos Baerga and Albert Belle and old veterans like Edsie Murray, Omar Visquel and Dennis Martinez in those days, and – wait, vets and rooks? That sounds just like Major League! Shoot, Kenny Lofton and Willie Mays Hayes might as well have been the same guy. It was like the movie came true.

But those American League pennants and division championships weren’t played at Municipal. In 1994, the Indians had left their massive and disappointing home for Jacobs Field, and they won right away.

Jacobs, aka “The Jake,” can even be seen as a Major League reference to Jake Taylor. (These days, it’s Progressive Field, aka “The Prog.”)

It’s like the movie was playing out in front of Cleveland’s very eyes. Just at a new and improved ballpark.

The Prog is alright, I guess. There are a couple unique features I liked: the left field wall is 19 feet tall so the ball plays differently out there than normal. For example, yesterday, Alex Gordon picked one up off the wall and gunned down Roberto Perez trying to sloooowly leg out a double. I liked the “Indians” script on top of the video board in left field, and I liked the smaller dimensions of the park. It’s only 320 and 323 to the left and right field corners.

But while the playing surface felt small, the ballpark did not. It didn’t feel as intimate as other parks. I’m not sure there was a foul ball to the upper deck the whole night (there probably were a couple, but not nearly as many as usual). I also wasn’t crazy about the video board itself or the asymmetrical overhang on only the third base line. Made for odd angles from my perspective behind the plate.

Progressive Field is clearly one of the oldest ballparks of the retro renaissance of ballpark design. It feels like the early 1990s…instead of the 1890s which is how “retro” is supposed to feel. It wasn’t bad. Just alight.

As a whole, the city of Cleveland has had some pretty crummy luck as a fan base. The Browns were so bad they packed up and moved to Baltimore (before being reestablished a few years later). They had their hearts ripped out by LeBron James and the Cavaliers a few years back. He’s “coming home” now, but who knows if he can actually bring them a championship. He is the Chosen One, afterall, right? The fans deserve a winner.

The Indians in their late-90s prime came close but never delivered. Tribe fans are a very passionate bunch. They cheer as loud as any group I’ve been around. They also seem close as a community – as a Royals fan, i understand this one; after enduring so much pain together, you can’t help but be close by the end.

They’re also loyal. Two examples of this: first, super-fan John Adams has been sitting out in the outfield bleachers since 1973 banging his drum for the team. Never missed a home game.

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There’s also this dude who’s been showing up dressed as a chicken this year because apparently there was a chicken in the bullpen earlier this year and the Indians won their next bundle of games. Ten, I think. I don’t really get it, he was so jacked up and he was talking so fast I couldn’t even understand him. Something about the lucky chicken being the only hope Cleveland has at this point.

That pic, by the way, was taken and tweeted by Joel Goldberg of Fox Sports Kansas City before last night’s game. That my dad with his hand raised. No idea who that other girl is.

I was there rooting for the opponent, so I was pretty annoyed by the group at times. As I left, I realized had they been playing any other AL team, I would’ve joined right in with their heckling. But they were talking about my boys! Don’t you taunt Hosmer! Get off Gordon’s back! And please please please stop chanting U-S-A when Aoki comes to the plate. (That was about the only thing they ever did that I was 100% not okay with.)

Interestingly, they dish t have anything bad to say about Lorenzo Cain. They probably recognize that he’s THE ABSOLUTE GREATEST.

Game Notes

Super frustrating night for the Royals. Jason Vargas was super bad. So bad that he may be last on the Royals playoff depth chart at this point. It’s between he and Guthrie.

Vargas had very little control, and for a guy who throws an upper 80s fastball, control is pretty dang important. He gave up 4 runs on 4 hits and 3 walks. He threw one pitch into the 5th inning and that one hit Michael Bourn who scored after Brandon Finnegan relieved Vargas.

Indians starter, Trevor Bauer, wasn’t much better, but he got luckier, honestly. The Royals hit him hard for the four innings he pitched, but couldn’t catch a timely break. The Royals outhit the Indians 10-7, but the Indians outscored the Royals 6-4.

The Indians, however. Got a very timely hit off Vargas in the first when Yan Gomes launched one over the centerfield wall in the first inning.

Salvador Perez continues to swing at everything thrown his way. He struck out twice with runners on first and second. Thanks Sal. Infuriating.

Moose hit two opposite field line drives with runners on base. Both were directly at the left fielder. The ball didn’t bounce the Royals way from the beginning.

This is not how I anticipated the Tour ending. In my mind, this game was going to be the grand finale. It was supposed to end with the Royals clenching a playoff spot or moving into first place. Detroit was supposed to lose on Tuesday and the Royals were supposed to finish the sweep on Wednesday. Instead, it will happen today if Seattle loses and KC wins.

Sometimes things just don’t go the way you think they will. To probably over-spiritualize it, you have one plan but God has another. Life isn’t a movie like Major League…even though this Royals season and this crazy Ballpark Tour have at certain points.

More on the Royals later. For now, it’s time to wrap this post – and this series up.

What a thrill it has been. I can now say that I’ve been to all thirty ballparks in the same season.

Now it’s time to get to writing the first draft of my book. I’m going to be taking all 30 teams and writing a chapter on each. Some chapters will focus on my experience at the game, others will focus on the team’s history, others will focus on what’s it’s like to be a fan of each team. I’m going to utilize this series as the notes/framework for the final product. So if you want a sneak peak, go back and read through all of the posts!

Okay. Signing off for now. More to come soon.

Thirty ballparks down. Zero to go.

Up Next: The Royals make the playoffs.

-apc.

Game 29: Comerica Park, Detroit

Disclaimer: I’m not going to sit here and act like I’m thrilled about last night’s outcome. The Royals desperately needed the Tigers to complete the 9th inning collapse. It was exciting, but the White Sox couldn’t finish the job.

Having said that, let’s see how good of a job I can do reporting on the Tigers and Comerica Park.

The Detroit Tigers have been around since 1894 as a part of the Western League. The rest of the teams in that league have either dissolved or moved to another city. The Milwaukee Brewers became the St. Louis Browns became the Baltimore Orioles; the Kansas City Blues became the Washington Senators became the Minnesota Twins; the Grand Rapids Rustlers moved to Cleveland and eventually became the Indians; the Souix City Cornhuskers became the St. Paul Saints became the Chicago White Sox; the rest of the league was dropped in 1901 when the American League was created.

But the Detroit Tigers remain. They joined the American League that year, and in 1912, they built their home for the next 87 years: Tiger Stadium.

Tiger Stadium was located in the Corktown neighborhood just a couple miles west of downtown, and was demolished in 1999 and replaced by Comerica Park. The demolition of one of baseball’s iconic ballparks was a very sad day for the city of Detroit and baseball fans around the country.

Tiger Stadium used to stand with Wrigley Field (1914), Fenway Park (1912), Ebbets Field (1913), Comiskey Park (1910), Shibe Park (1909), Forbes Field (1909) and Griffith Stadium (1911) as parks built during the glory days of ballparks. Obviously Fenway and Wrigley still stand today. Forbes, Griffith, Shibe and Ebbets were done away with decades ago. Comiskey is a heartbreaker because it certainly would still be standing if it had only waited a few more years to see what Baltimore did at Camden Yards. Instead they’re stuck with The Cell – aptly named, really.

The Tigers were the last of the bunch to tear down their historic park, but they’re the only ones of the demolished group to survive to the retro-ballpark movement. They don’t have any excuses.

The old park site is still a green field at the corner of Trumbull Street and Michigan Avenue. We* stopped by and walked out on to the old infield. I toed the rubber where Bob Gibson pitched in the World Series of his historic 1968 season when he recorded a 1.12 ERA. He allowed 49 runs all season in over 300 innings.

* – By the way, I should mention that I invited my parents to join me for these last 4 games. That’s what I mean when I say “we.”

After a dominating Game 1 performance, Gibson lost his next two starts as the Tigers defeated the Cardinals for their third of their four championships. They haven’t won since leaving, despite winning the American League in 2006 and 2012, and the division the last three years (and potentially four if they can hold off the all-but-guaranteed-to-win-it-all Royals). I’m guessing we’ll be talking about some sort of Curse of Tiger Stadium about 50 years from now.

Here are a couple shots of what it looks like today. The first and last are what it used to look like.
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Notice the gate entrances in the old pics and the outfield flag pole.

Actually, with the way Detroit is headed, it might be way sooner than 50 years. No city has been hit harder by the down turn in the US economy than Detroit. The population has plummeted in recent years: $1.8M in 1950; $1M by 1990; $900K in 2009…and less than 700K today. Downtown is old and crumbling, the automotive industry is in a tailspin – just this morning an employee at our hotel told me that the Cadillac is separating from GM and leaving Detroit for New York. Another 700 Detroiters out of jobs and likely out of town. Hard times in Motown.

At least the baseball team gives them something to cheer about these days. Back-to-back and reigning AL MVP, Miguel Cabrera first and foremost, and a pitching staff featuring three Cy Young winners: Justin Verlander, Max Scherzer and newly acquired David Price.

Now, don’t get me wrong, Comerica is a beautiful park with lots of nods to the ballparks of the past. The massive flag pole in center was originally in play when the ballpark was first built, just like Tiger Stadium. Unlike most ballparks, they have a dirt path between home plate and the pitching rubber, a nod to a time when grounds keeping wasn’t as advanced and the amount of travel of pitchers and catchers would wear a track into the grass.

The brick beyond the 424′ centerfield wall is a nice touch. It features the names of past Tiger greats such as Ty Cobb, Al Kaline, Hank Greenberg, Willie Horton, Hal Newhouser, and Charlie Gehringer face the field of play. Behind the wall are statues of these same players doing what they did best. Naturally, Ty Cobb is shown sliding spikes up.

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In the book, this chapter might end up being about Ty Cobb. We’ll see.

The craziest thing that happened at the game last night: two fans in our section got hit in the head by foul balls. One was sitting right next to us in our row. In the second inning, a ball off the bat of Semien popped over our heads just nipping the edge of the upper deck and caroming straight down at us. The guy didn’t take cover in time and it hit him just above the eye, splitting his brow, requiring a few stitches.

Then again in the 8th, with Rajai Davis batting, a ball came up over our heads bounced off the face of the third deck and came rocketing back off toward home plate and hit a woman in the same spot as our neighbor. She left with out any blood, but a noticeable black eye.

The fans are surprisingly close to the action at baseball games when you think about it, but in all the games I’ve been to in my life, I’ve never seen anything like that.

In more positive news, two other foul balls came our way and landed a few rows below us. Two different men caught them and handed it to young boys nearby. Bravo, gents. Well played.

I’ve never gotten a foul ball by the way. I’ve been to around 50 ball games this year, and haven’t even been involved in a scrum for one. I’ve had players and coaches toss me a ball, but I’ve never pulled an actual gameplay ball.

On to the game notes, because that’s what’s most exciting here.

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Game Notes:

This game was a lot of scoreboard watching, which might explain how multiple people weren’t paying attention and got hit by foul balls. Going into the game, the Tigers sat in first place in the AL Central. One game up on the Royals. A loss would allow the Royals to potentially move into first if they won.

They also sat with the same record as the wild card leading Athletics who played later and three games up on the Mariners who are fighting for the last wild card spot.

This game was a pitchers duel for the first 6 innings. Scott Carroll battled the Tigers potent lineup through 6 innings giving up the first run of the game off a Davis single to start the 7th, and a throwing error by the catcher as Davis tried to steal third.

The Royals, meanwhile, were winning big. The game finished 7-1, but the were up for the majority of the game, so Tigers fans knew this was a necessary win.

Things got away from the White Sox when they pulled Carroll after he let the leadoff man on in the 7th. Belisario came in and got the lead runner at second on an attempted sacrifice bunt, but an error by Semien on probably an inning-ending doubleplay groundball to third allowed the inning to continue. The Tigers would score two runs and take a 3-0 lead.

But the real drama came in the 9th. David Price had a 4-hit shutout going and Tigers manager, Brad Ausmus, sent him out to complete the game. Adam Eaton singled softly up the middle and the Sox’ rally was on.

Ausmus came out to talk to Price. With Joe “Every Save’s an Adventure” Nathan warm in the bullpen, it looked like Price was done and Ramirez-Abreu-Garcia, all righties, would face the righty Nathan instead.

Except the fans didn’t want it. The Tigers’ bullpen has been absolutely terrible all season, and the fans wanted Price to get the CG SO. They hollered and yelled and booed at the idea of trusting the anyone in the bullpen with this game, let alone Nathan. This is the same Joe Nathan who flipped of the fans a few months back. There’s some emotional strain in the relationship, it seems.

Ausmus, whether influenced by the fans or of his own accord, opted to stick with Price.

It was the wrong choice. Price gave up two more runs and the game was tied. Let’s be honest though, Ausmus faced a lose-lose situation. Nathan probably wouldn’t have done any better. Speaks volumes to how little the Tigers think of their miserable bullpen. I mean, there’s nobody out there better than a tired David Price? No one is better fresh than Price is after 8 innings? I really don’t know if there is.

Finally, Nathan came in and got Suarez to fly out to center with the bases loaded to end the rally.

The White Sox brought in Jake Petricka to face the Tigers in the bottom of the 9th. Due up: Kinsler-Hunter-Cabrera. It wasn’t shocking what happened next. Kinsler singled. Hunter walked. Cabrera singled and Kinsler scored. Game over.

The Tigers rely almost exclusively on starting pitching and power hitting to win ballgames, and this game was no different. The Tigers maintained their 1 game lead in the Central. Their magic number is 2 to make the playoffs and 5 clench the Central with 5 games left.

Also, just for the record…

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Twenty-nine down. One to go.

Final stop: Cleveland Indians.

-apc.

Photo cred for the last two here and here. All others are mine.