The Royals are 88-63: Get your champagne ready…

The magic number is two. It could happen tonight.

Wouldn’t it be perfect if Johnny Cueto went out tonight and pitched lights out, clinching the Royals’ first ever AL Central division championship? Of course, we also need Minnesota to lose to Cleveland, but I was looking at the Indians’ lines against Twins’ starter Kyle Gibson, and check out these beauties…

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This is from ESPN’s stats page. Mike Aviles 4-6. Yan Gomes 5-9 with 2 HR. Michael Brantley (who, unfortunately, is injured) 4-11. Jason Kipnis is 2-6. Santana only has 1 hit but it was a 2-run HR. As a team they bat .344/.438/.557. No member of the Tribe who has faced Kyle Gibson is hitless against him. So, what I’m saying here is that I like our chances of clinching tonight.

The Johnny-Salvy Pairing

Throw in the fact that the Royals seem to have finally discovered the source of Cueto’s struggles and one could foresee the Royals popping corks in their home dugout about 8 hours from now.

This Johnny Cueto/Salvador Perez dynamic is really interesting to me. Andy McCullough wrote a fascinating piece following Cueto’s last start against Cleveland on how Salvy’s setup behind the plate wasn’t comfortable for his new ace. You can read that article here.

It makes sense. The 3-time All-Star catcher and soul of the team has his way of doing things. The new guy staff ace rental has his way. No one wants to butt heads. They both want to give the other the benefit of the doubt. But it wasn’t working. Finally, Cueto spoke up. We’ll see how things shake out over the next few starts.

Some folks – primarily on Twitter, so let’s not take it all too seriously – have suggested that Cueto pitch to the smaller, lower to the ground Drew Butera down the stretch. That, in the opinion of this fan blogger, would be pretty idiotic. Why would we ever want to get Cueto used to a catcher whose only purpose on the postseason roster will to be a backup catcher in case of injury? We don’t want Butera even touching a bat in a postseason game. No no no. You spend the next two weeks getting Cueto and Salvy on the same page so our best team takes the field in October. Come on, people.

Holland out. Wade in. Finally.

Ned Yost announced yesterday prior to the Royals 4-3 walks win over the Mariners that Greg Holland is out as the Royals closer and Wade Davis is in. Kelvin Herrera slides back an inning and takes over Wade’s 8th inning duties. Ryan Madson slides into the 7th to take over for Herrera. The 6th inning will be a mix/match situation, but I’m hoping Danny Duffy wants the job.

You have to wonder what took the Royals so long to make this move. It’s been very clear for more than a year that the best man in the Royals bullpen was Wade Davis. In fact, Davis has been so historically good that he may have the greatest two-year stretch by any reliever in the history of baseball. Why isn’t your best man pitching your most important inning? It could even be argued that Greg Holland wasn’t even the second best closer on the team. Herrera has been dominant as well. Yet there he was. He’s supposedly been dealing with elbow issues sin the All-Star break. His velocity is down. His control is miserable. He occasionally shows glimpses of his former self, but when a guy can’t command a fastball, he has no business being a closer.

With Holland being a free agent at year’s end, we’ve certainly seen the last of Greg Holland as a closer.

UPDATE: About two hours after this post the Royals announced that Holland has a significant UCL tear and will be shut down for the season. Supposedly he’s had the year since LAST AUGUST and has been pitching through pain. Crazy.

This Royals team isn’t messing around.

The last thing I’ll say here is that the Royals aren’t messing around this year. In the past, the Royals would’ve stuck with guys like Alcides Escobar leading off or Greg Holland closing or Danny Duffy getting more work in the rotation for the future. Not this year. This is 2015 and this – despite what the 2012 slogan maintained – is our time.

The Royals best 6 OBP guys are hitting 1 through 6 in the lineup. The Royals best bullpen arm is closing. Their second best is pitching the 8th. The Royals see that Kris Medlen is pitching much better than Danny Duffy and make the move early to prepare for the postseason. Even if that means Jeremy Guthrie has to get shelled a start or two, that’s okay, because Duffy needs to get used to the bullpen. The Royals aren’t afraid to bench their overpaid second baseman, Omar Infante (who is now going to be out a couple weeks with an oblique injury), or threaten to bench their underperforming and now bearded right fielder, Alex Rios, who has shockingly been our best hitter over the past month.

This team finally gets it. Actually, I probably shouldn’t say “finally” – I think Dayton Moore and Ned Yost have always gotten it, but they’re not playing for next year anymore. They’re finally playing for right now, and they’re making all the right moves to prepare us for the ALDS and hopefully beyond.

-apc.

2015 MLB Predictions

Congratulations, baseball fans. You did it. You successfully navigated the miserable winter months. Spring has arrived. And, save for a flurry of offseason moves and meaningless spring training games, you’ve been deprived of the game you love. But the wait is over.

Thankfully, for those of us in Kansas City, the offseason went by much faster this year due to it being one month shorter than it has been the previous 29 years. Still, it’s good to have baseball back.

Before I make my predictions for the 2015 season, let me quickly point out how wildly successful my 2014 predictions were. I, along with everyone else who predicted these things, whiffed on the AL East. I missed on the Pirates too, and made the mistake of picking against the A’s. But 7/10 ain’t bad.

So here we go. Let’s look into the future together. Postseason picks in italics. I’ve added ALCS/NLCS/WS/MVP/Cy Young winners this year too.

AL East

  1. Boston Red Sox
  2. Baltimore Orioles
  3. Toronto Blue Jays
  4. New York Yankees
  5. Tampa Bay Rays

Another year of uncertainty in the AL East. The Red Sox reloaded adding Pablo Sandoval and Hanley Ramirez. The Yankees did nothing and appear fragile. The Blue Jays added Josh Donaldson but are young and lack a rotation. The Orioles were predicted to stink it up last year but ran away with the division and are likely under projected in 2015. The Rays are a dark horse as always.

Typically I refuse to buy into teams that spend tons of money to restock their teams. I think it takes a year to gel as a unit and establish an identity. However, the Red Sox rotation is already strong and on paper this is the best team in the division. Look for Mookie Betts to break out this year too.

AL Central

  1. Kansas City Royals
  2. Cleveland Indians
  3. Detroit Tigers
  4. Chicago White Sox
  5. Minnesota Twins

Another wide open division, and one where I am obviously biased. The Indians return basically the same team but their defense is terrible. The Tigers added Yoenis Cespedes but lost Max Scherzer, and now Verlander is injured. The Royals are defending AL Champs and have lots of swagger, lost Billy Butler, James Shields and Nori Aoki but added Kendrys Morales, Alex Rios, Edinson Volquez and Kris Medlen. The White Sox had perhaps the best offseason of any AL team. The Twins will not contend.

But I’m picking my hometown boys. People keep saying the Royals got worse in the offseason but I just don’t see it. Morales and Rios are both upgrades. Shields is gone, but Danny Duffy and Yordano Ventura both have the potential to match his production. Plus they have three of the most sustainable strengths to their advantage: bullpen, defense and speed. I believe in this team, but I wouldn’t be shocked to see the Indians and Royals swap spots. I also wouldn’t be surprised to see the Tigers absolutely tank and finish 4th.

AL West

  1. Seattle Mariners
  2. Oakland Athletics
  3. Los Angeles Angels
  4. Houston Astros
  5. Texas Rangers

I’m not going to make the mistake of picking against Oakland two years in a row. The A’s blew up their entire team and look like they’re probably going to win the Cactus League this year too, whatever that’s good for (absolutely nothing). The Angels and Mariners are both really good though and it’s hard to pick one of the three to miss. The Mariners just missed the playoffs last year. If they can stay healthy, I think they’ll run away with this division in 2015. The Angels will likely regress slightly and should still contend, but I think they’ll end up on the outside looking in. Houston will continue to improve – they appear to be trying out the Royals model of success in bolstering up their bullpen. The Rangers are going to be bad.

NL East

  1. Washington Nationals
  2. Miami Marlins
  3. New York Mets
  4. Atlanta Braves
  5. Philadelphia Phillies

While the American League has all sorts of intrigue, the National League is a joke. Washington is going to run away with this division. They were already the best, and then they added Max Scherzer. The Marlins and Mets are both no slouch, but the Nats could win 100 games this year. The Marlins added Dee Gordon, Michael Morse and Mat Latos. They extended Giancarlos Stanton and get Jose Fernandez back from injury. The Mets get their ace back too in Matt Harvey. Plus both teams get 18 games against the Phillies and the Braves which ought to inflate their records a bit. They’ll be in the mix come September.

NL Central

  1. St. Louis Cardinals
  2. Pittsburgh Pirates
  3. Chicago Cubs
  4. Milwaukee Brewers
  5. Cincinnati Reds

As has become the norm, this division race will be good, but the Cardinals will eventually pull away and the Pirates will separate themselves form the rest. The Cubs obviously got much better with the acquisition of Jon Lester, and if they can get their prospect trio – Kris Bryant, Jorge Solar and Javier Baez – into the majors sooner than later, they could manage to make a push in the second half. But I do think 2016 is their year to return to the playoffs.

NL West

  1. Los Angeles Dodgers
  2. San Diego Padres
  3. San Francisco Giants
  4. Arizona Diamondbacks
  5. Colorado Rockies

The Dodgers are only going to be better from last year. They added Jimmy Rollins and dropped Matt Kemp. Clayton Kershaw is the best pitcher and best player in baseball, in my opinion. You can talk about Trout all you want, but Kershaw has the power to completely dominate a game. The Padres added Justin Upton, Kemp, and former Royal and Ray, Wil Myers. Their biggest addition is James Shields. Their bullpen is dominant too. They could do some damage, but I see them finishing as the first team out. The Giants got much worse this offseason with the loss of Panda, and with the injury to Pence. Plus, Madison Bumgarner is super overrated. The Rockies and D-Backs are…not great.

So my postseason looks like this:

AL: Red Sox, Royals, Mariners, Indians, Athletics
NL: Nationals, Cardinals, Dodgers, Pirates, Marlins

ALCS: Mariners over Athletics
NLDS: Dodgers over Nationals

WS: Dodgers over Mariners

AL MVP: Mike Trout
NL MVP: Yasiel Puig

AL Cy Young: Felix Hernandez
NL Cy Young: Clayton Kershaw

Here’s to a great 2015 MLB season! As always, I’ll be rooting for a 1985 rematch. (Which nearly happened last year. So close.)

-apc.

Game 28: Rogers Centre, Toronto

O Canada!

Our home and native land!

True patriot love in all thy sons command.

With glowing hearts we see thee rise,

The True North strong and free!

From far and wide,

O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

God keep our land glorious and free!

O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

O Canada,
we stand on guard for thee.

In the early 90’s, while other kids were slicing through defenses as Bo Jackson and Walter Peyton in Tecmo Bowl, I was bunting and stealing with Tim Raines and Vince Coleman and launching home runs with Matt Nokes and Darryl Strawberry in RBI Baseball.

There were only 10 team options on the original game: California, Boston, Minnesota, St. Louis, Houston, New York Mets, Detroit, San Francisco, and the American and National League All-Stars. Those were your only options. Before each game, after you selected your teams, the game would play the first few measures of the Star-Spangled Banner. It was always somewhat annoying because I was ready to play ball and was forced to sit through the song. I would still press A repeatedly, trying my hardest to speed up the game…it never helped. But I did it anyway.

A few years later, I picked up RBI Baseball 3, which featured every MLB team with expanded current rosters, past playoff team rosters, and much thinner ballplayers. I remember being so excited to play as the entire Montreal team because Tim Raines was the only player from the original game from the Expos and he was so fast. I also had a strange affinity for Marquis Grissom, Montreal’s centerfielder.

I remember opening that game, inserting the cartridge – probably pulling it out and blowing into if a dozen times – then selecting Montreal (subbing in Grissom off the bench), sitting and listening to the Star-Spangled Banner…

…but what was this other song?!?

You mean when I play as the Expos, I’m forced to sit through two anthems? Well, so much for playing as the Expos* ever again. Ain’t nobody got time for that!

* – As this tour is drawing to a close, it’s dawning on me how disappointing it is that Montreal doesn’t have a ball club anymore. That crazy fan base deserves one. Maybe if they host another exhibition series next year I’ll make the trip up for an epilogue/bonus Chapter 31.

Unless you chose the other Canadian team to play against. Then you only had to listen to one song and could play ball sooner. Brilliant!

That team was, obviously, the Toronto Blue Jays. And while I was busy playing them in RBI Baseball, they were busy ruling the baseball world in the early 90s.

The Jays won two consecutive World Series in 1992 and 1993 with contributions from Roberto Alomar, John Olerud and his helmet, Dave Winfield, Jimmy Key, Paul Molitor, Juan Guzman and, of course, Joe Carter, who hit a walkoff HR to take home the Series in Game 6 in 1993.

Things are done a little differently north of the border. The French Canadian influence isn’t nearly as heavy in Toronto as it is in Montreal but things remain just a tiny bit different from baseball on the other side of the border.

Baseball games are liturgical. There’s an order of events that takes place at every game that the patrons are familiar with. It usually goes something like this…

Around 15 minutes before gametime, there is a ceremonial first pitch or three. After some announcements about how charitable the team is, starting lineups are announced. Then “all rise and remove your caps for the playing of our National Anthem.” Then some kid gets called upon to shout out “Play Ball!”

Fast forwarding through goofy gimmicks like the Kiss Cam, Ball Shuffle, Flex Cam, Grounds Crew Inning, Trivia Contests, the Jump Around Cam, Condiment Races*, etc., to the 7th Inning Stretch where we all stand up and sing “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” and usually “God Bless America” too.

* – For those of you dying to know, Mustard won the 2014 Championship in KC. Relish led all season and then choked down the stretch. Ketchup fell on his face in the finale. You’ll get em next year, Relish,

Each team has it’s own flare to their liturgy. The Angels use the Rally Monkey. The Rays have their cowbells. The Nationals spell out N-A-T-S after each run scored. The Royals play “Kansas City” and sing “hey, hey, hey, hey!” after each home win.

But as a whole, a baseball fan from anywhere can enter a different ballpark without feeling disoriented to what’s going on. There’s an order that we’ve all learned over our years as baseball fans. And even beyond that, there’s a way for us as fans to engage in the rituals offered by the game. Chanting. Clapping. Rally caps. Throwing back home run balls. Booing Robinson Cano.

Toronto was disorienting at two major moments. The first we’ve already talked about: the Canadian National Anthem, “O Canada.”

The second occurs during the 7th Inning Stretch. Rather than rolling straight into “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” the Jays have their own song with choreographed calisthenics that comes first called “OK Blue Jays (Let’s Play Ball!). It goes like this…

You’ve got a diamond
You’ve got nine men
You’ve got a hat and a bat
And that’s not all
You’ve got the bleachers
Got ’em from spring ’til fall
You got a dog and a drink
And the umpire’s call
Waddaya want?
Let’s play ball!

Okay (okay)
Blue Jays (Blue Jays)
Let’s (Let’s) Play (Play) Ball!

I’m not one to typically judge cultural differences, but that song is weird and you’re throwing off the entire rhythm of the game. Just do it the way it’s supposed to be done. Sheesh. (Just kidding. Kinda.)

All that to say, it’s an obvious connection to how different communities engage in a worship gathering. What are the rhythms of baseball as a whole, but how does each team orient their practices around these rhythms. Fascinating stuff.

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The Rogers Centre was once the newest and most impressive ballpark in the game. It was built in 1989 as the SkyDome and was the first retractable that worked. The Expos’ Olympic Stadium was supposed to open up but never worked properly, but the SkyDome preceded every other working retractable roof: Houston, Arizona, Seattle, Milwaukee and Miami, It was a modern marvel: 22 million pounds that could slide open at the flip of a switch and get 90% of the seats in the sun.

It was closed last night, which was disappointing, but otherwise Toronto was a terrific host.

The place is huge and embedded among the buildings of downtown Toronto. It has the feel of a basketball or hockey arena more than a ballpark from the outside. And the proximity of the surrounding structures made it impossible to get a picture of the entire park from outside.

It’s right next to the CN Tower, the skyline’s giant space needle. When the roof is open, the Tower can be seen looming above the outfield.

There’s a hotel inside the ballpark too, which is pretty sweet. Imagine sitting i your hotel room and watching the game happen outside your window. Almost wish I’d sprung for a room but it’s hard to beat $8 tickets behind the plate.

With the roof closed, the interior is cavernous. I read somewhere that the peak of the dome is something like 300 feet above the playing field, which allows for 5 levels of seats, not that anyone was sitting up top. It holds 49,282 fans.

The other thing I noticed that was a stark contrast to American teams: it was very evident the ballpark attendants do not care at all where fans sit. Everyone was right behind the plate, myself included. Our tickets were in section 521. We sat in section 120. Nearly every fan in the place was packed in the lower level and just kinda picked whatever seat they wanted with no argument from the staff.

In nearly every other park, you can’t just waltz down to the lower level without some sort of questioning or permission from a staff person. Even at the most sparsely attended games most section attendants require the correct ticket when it comes to the lower level seats. Chalk it up to good ole Canadian passivity, probably.

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The kid in this picture was terrific the whole game. Just going crazy after every half inning. Later, the woman standing next to him won $4,300 the 50/50 Raffle. But that’s all I have to say about that.

Toronto seems likes a great city. Of what I saw of it, it felt a ton like Chicago – right on the Lake, lots of sprawling suburbs, and you can even see the city from across the lake just like you can Chicago from Gary, Indiana. It’s a big city, and s beautiful one. But what really made it a great experience was the game itself. So let’s get to that now.

Game Note:

The Blue Jays are on the verge of elimination, but they opened up a series against the Seattle Mariners last night who are right in the midst of the Wild Card race. They are currently the first team out of the AL playoff race, and last night’s game pushed them another step out of contention.

Tonight’s matchup is R.A. Dickey against Felix Hernandez. This marks the third time I’ve missed seeing King Felix pitch by a day. Instead we saw James Paxton for Seattle and J.A. Happ for Toronto. Happ was solid through 7 innings. Paxton was not solid and didn’t make it through the 3rd.

This one was a blowout.

The Blue Jays lit up the Mariners for 14 runs on 16 hits. Former Royal, Danny Valencia got them started early with a bases loaded triple in the 1st, and a 5 run 3rd made it a 9-1 game early.

Jose Bautista, aka Joey Bats, had a day: 3-3 with a HR, BB, and 3 runs scored. He also had a great day on defense. He threw out Logan Morrison from the warning track as Morrison tried to turn a single into a double, and he had a Web Gem snag diving across his body in right-centerfield.

The Jays hit two more homers – Kevin Pillar in the 6th and Anthony Gose batting for Bautista in the 7th.

Happ got into a bit of trouble in the first and allows Austin Jackson to score before working around runners on 1st and 3rd with 1 out. The Mariners hit two solo HRs late in the game – Seagar off of Happ in the 6th, but the other off the bullpen in the 9th by Denorfia – and scored another in the 8th to make it less embarrassing, but the Jays hit the ball hard all night and won 14-4. The Jays side of my scorecard was very busy.

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The Mariners fell further behind the Royals, Athletics and Tigers for the wild card spots. Either the Royals or Tigers will win the AL Central, and two of the other three will take the WC spots. Seattle is beginning to look like the team left out.

On the road back to the United States now. See you soon, Detroit.

Twenty-eight down. Two to go.

Up next: Detroit Tigers.

-apc.

The Royals are 79-62. So let’s talk completely in hypotheticals about the final 3 weeks of the season.

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The Royals’ Magic Number is 19.

The Royals went into New York this weekend and made it very clear who the better team is without the offense doing anything to help out. The pitching was lights out – as usual* – it was the defense that was the difference in both wins. Yankees made 4 errors over the weekend and all three Royals runs in their two wins were unearned.

Over three games NY outscored them 6-5, yet KC won the series.

* – Side note: I’m becoming aware of the fact that I’m taking the Royals defense and pitching for granted. Whenever I watch another team play, it’s startling and embarrassing to watch at times. Most Royals fans haven’t experienced that feeling…ever.

On Friday, Big Game James Shields was absolutely dominant going 8.1 innings of shut out ball, with only 3 hits against him. He struck out 6. Michael Pineda was impressive himself even without any pine tar on his neck.

The only run in the game came in the 3rd when Alcides Escobar took second base on a Chase Headley fielding error. Nori Aoki singled him in on the next at bat. Wade Davis got his first career save with an ailing Greg Holland. Royals win 1-0.

As I said in my last Royals-related post, I think Danny Duffy is the ace of the future for this team (okay, along with Yordano Ventura), so it hurts to see him go down with shoulder soreness. He threw one pitch and that was it. He never looked comfortable warming up – he kept shaking out his arm after every toss – and Salvador Perez knew immediately that he wasn’t good to go.

Let’s hope Duffman only misses 1 start. I don’t want to see Guthrie pitching in the playoffs. Shields, Vargas, Duffy and Yordano is the rotation we want.

Liam Hendriks came in and pitched…just not well enough. He went 4 innings and gave up 4 runs (3 earned) on 7 hits. Casey Coleman gave up two more runs. The Yankees won 6-2 on what turned into a throw away game after Duffy left.

The bright side from Saturday: rookie Brandon Finnegan looked terrific in his MLB debut. Six batters up, six batters down. We haven’t seen the end of him.

Then Sunday, Yordano Ventura looked as good as ever: 6 innings, 0 runs, 3 hits. He continues to have short lapses of focus and will occasionally walk some guys. It’s strange – he’ll look totally dominant, and then throw 4 straight balls that aren’t even close. Probably just a product of being young.

The Royals’ offense continued to do next to nothing, 2 runs on 7 hits, but with this pitching staff/bullpen it was all they needed. Crow and Herrera both threw scoreless innings and Davis got his second career save.

They also spoiled Derek Jeter Day at Yankee Stadium, which no one really feels bad about, right?

Which makes the Royals 79-62. The Tigers won Sunday night, so the lead in the AL Central is 2 games. Royals are a .5 game behind Oakland for the top Wild Card spot, and 1.5 games up on the Mariners in the second WC spot.

ESPN has the Royals playoff odds at 83.4%. Fangraphs has them at 76.1%.

So let’s quickly project out the final 3 weeks of the season – 6 series – and see what we need to do. I’m going to lean heavily on the “but what if we stink” side of the convo. Our remaining schedule…

Sept 8-10: @DET
Sept 11-14: BOS
Sept 15-17: CWS
Sept 19-21: DET
Sept 22-24: @CLE
Sept 25-28: @CWS

The two series against the Tigers are the most important. In my mind, if we take 4 of those 6 games, the rest of them hardly matter. That would put us 3.5 games up. But for the sake of this, let’s say we go 2-4 in those games.

Sept 8-10: @DET (1-2)
Sept 11-14: BOS
Sept 15-17: CWS
Sept 19-21: DET (1-2)
Sept 22-24: @CLE
Sept 25-28: @CWS

Now let’s look at the two CWS series. Assuming we hit Chris Sale in both series (9/15 and 9/26 by my count), the only other pitcher our guys could struggle with is Jose Quintana, who we’ll face twice too. Let’s say we lose both Sale games, one against Quintana, and one randomly against Danks/Carroll/Noesi.

Sept 8-10: @DET (1-2)
Sept 11-14: BOS
Sept 15-17: CWS (1-2)
Sept 19-21: DET (1-2)
Sept 22-24: @CLE
Sept 25-28: @CWS (2-2)

The Red Sox series actually worries me. I don’t want any reminders of that Fenway series after the All-Star Break. In that series, we faced Buchholz, De La Rosa and Lester; thankfully, Lester plays for the Athletics now so that offsets the fact that we had to face him twice with Oakland at least somewhat. By my count, we’ll face the other two next weekend in KC. Plus we apparently stink at home in sold out games, which those will be. Let’s say we lose both of those and win one of the other two against “TBA”…

Sept 8-10: @DET (1-2)
Sept 11-14: BOS (1-3)
Sept 15-17: CWS (1-2)
Sept 19-21: DET (1-2)
Sept 22-24: @CLE
Sept 25-28: @CWS (2-2)

At this point, I’ve been super negative on our odds, so let’s say we win 2 of the 3 actual games against the Indians. The fourth game is the make-up from the other day. We are already down and will likely lose that one.

Sept 8-10: @DET (1-2)
Sept 11-14: BOS (1-3)
Sept 15-17: CWS (1-2)
Sept 19-21: DET (1-2)
Sept 22-24: @CLE (2-2)
Sept 25-28: @CWS (2-2)

So, worst case scenario (realistically) puts us at 8-13 the rest of the way, which means we end the season 87-75.

As of this post, Fangraphs lists the following projected wins for the A’s, Tigers and Mariners…

Oakland: 91.7
Detroit: 88.7
Seattle: 88.5

…so in a realistic worst case scenario, we would miss the playoffs by 1.5 games, and the division by 1.6. Highlights the importance of these games against Detroit. Going 3-3 the rest of the way puts us in a great position, but 4-2 against the Tigers all but seals up the division. We’ll look at that in a minute.

All that to say, 10 more wins should do it. That would put us at 89-73 and above the projected finish of both SEA and DET. With the caveat that at least 3 of those wins probably need to be against the Tigers.

Of course, that’s not what I think will happen. I see this being a 91-win team at the end of it. The weekend home series are the scariest based on our recent history in such games. I actually think we will win 2 of 3 in Detroit this week and 3 of 4 in Chicago to end the season. Going .500 over the rest of them would mean 12-9, or a 91-71 season.

The question, for me, is when will we clench?

Our magic number is currently 19, so any combination of Royals wins and Tigers losses that add up to 19 clenches it for us. If we take 2 of 3 this week, that makes the number 15.

If both teams go .500 between meetings (DET 3-3, KC 4-3) that would put our number at 8. If we win 1 of 3 at home against Detroit: 6. If we win 2 of 3: our magic number would be 4.

Which means the clencher will likely happen sometime +/- a day or two around September 26 in Chicago. Coming down to the wire. The season ends on the 28th, so we don’t have much wiggle room.

I’m going to be in Cleveland on the last game if that series on September 24. Watching the Royals win the division in person would be a dream come true, but I think I’ll miss it by a couple days.

But if we win the two series against Detroit, there’s a borderline decent chance I’ll get to see the Royals clench in Cleveland. If the split, it’ll be that weekend in Chicago.

And if we lose the next two series to Detroit………actually, I don’t want to talk about that right now.

-apc.

Photo: John Sleezer, KC Star. Original.

Game 10: Safeco Field, Seattle

Two things about Seattle: it’s an awesomely beautiful place, and their residents don’t really care about their sports teams.

Sure, it’s fun to go to a Seahawks or a Mariners game, but this is not a passionate fan base. They cheer for their team, but it’s more about being outdoors and enjoying the night together than it is about the success of the team.

So this post won’t talk about the team much. Because, frankly, it’s not what’s important in Seattle.

What is important: recycling, bike riding, the public market, conserving energy, the outdoors…it’s a very “green” city in both the colorful and ecological senses.

And why wouldn’t you be? It’s a gorgeous place. Coming from smoggy LA to crisp and clean Seattle was like biting into a York Peppermint Patty.

It’s no wonder why so many people move to the Pacific Northwest. It’s a breathtakingly pretty place.

My wife, Karlie, is with me on this portion of the Tour. We spent time with some of our KC friends have moved up here recently – Meredith and Tim & Beth. Meredith has spent the last two years as a student at Seattle Pacific University while Tim & Beth made the move this past fall. They’re new to the area, and they love it, but they’re definitely still dealing with the tension of leaving home behind.

We went to the Mariners game with Tim & Beth and had a blast rooting for the Royals, who won easily, 6-1. They’re going back again tonight to cheer on the boys in blue.

For Meredith, Seattle is starting to feel like home a bit though. She’s built a new community of college friends and found a church she loves. Plus, college just fosters an atmosphere of meeting new people and building new life-long friendships. Kansas City is still home though – her parents and sisters are back there and she definitely misses their faces.

Meredith showed us around town in the afternoon. We visited the Market, saw the Gum Wall* and the original Starbucks. We walked down to the Waterfront and I ate a crab-stuffed king salmon for lunch because salmon is to Seattle as a BBQ sandwich is to KC. Comparably priced too.

* – Business idea: set up a candy shop/bubble gum machine right next to the Gum Wall. Guaranteed millions.

Occasionally when I visit different cities I remember that I have the freedom to live anywhere I want. I’ve lived in Kansas City for 27 years, and I don’t really want to leave, but the thought of leaving sometimes crosses my mind. My wife and I love to dream about how amazing it would be to live somewhere new: explore a new city, eat different foods, and enjoy different weather. Maybe even cheer for new sports teams…ehhhh, doubtful.

Seattle was definitely one of those places. It’s a gorgeous city, surrounded by green forests and white-capped mountains sitting on the bay. The weather oscillates from sunny to rainy by the moment, and the salmon and crab are the freshest you’ll find.

But wait. We couldn’t do that. We can’t leave our home!

But what is it that makes something “home”?

I’ve heard that pets make a house feel like a home. Or putting pictures on the walls. Or plants. But what makes a new city feel like home? My opinion…

Family. Community. Relationships.

It’s the only reason I’m still living in Kansas City; that’s where my people are, and that’s what makes it home.

Meredith is starting to feel like she has those things in Seattle. She has a community and has established a web of relationships, but she still misses here other people back in KC. Which one is home for her? Tough to say.

Tim and Beth have been in the northwest for much less time and are still getting to know their new community. Beth told us a story from right after they moved here where she saw a guy wearing a K-State shirt (her alma mater), and she said wanted to hug him because it was someone she “knew”. She was missing Kansas City, and that guy was a glimpse of home.

It felt that way after the game last night too as we were throwing up high fives and shouting “go Royals!” to everyone in a KC cap. An extension of our community back home.

We aren’t moving to Seattle – or anywhere else in the world probably – but it isn’t because we wouldn’t love to. It’s because of our family, community and relationships we have in KC. And that’s what makes it our home.

Game Notes:

There was a game too, and the Royals pretty much dominates by slapping 16 singles al over the yard. Everyone but Mike Moustakas had a single, and six different guys had 2+ singles.

Brandon Maurer, the Seattle starter, had a bizarro line: 7.1 IP, 14 H, 6 R, 4 ER…0 BB and 0 K. Jayson Stark of ESPN posted to Twitter that it was the first time someone had given up 14+ hits with 0 BB and 0 K since Whitey Ford in 1966.

Jason Vargas was terrific for the Royals: 7 IP, 0 R, 3 H, 6 K.

The Mariners offense is struggling, and I don’t expect them to pick up any against Yordano Ventura tonight. The Royals ought to win their 6th series in the last 8 chances and get back to .500 for the first time in over a week.

I should also note: the retractable roof is super cool at Safeco. It takes about 10-15 minutes to open/close, and when we got there it was closed due to some rain. But, as Seattle weather does, the next moment it was sunny and mostly perfect, so they opened it up.

It was a quick trip, and I wish we could’ve stayed longer, but it’s on to Oakland tonight!

Ten down. Twenty to go.

Up Next: Oakland Athletics.

-apc.

The West Coast Tour

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Let’s recap.

The tour began in Cincinnati for the Opening Day. Then it came home to Kansas City and over to St. Louis for the home openers in the two ballparks where I feel home. Then the tour took me east to west across the southern part of the country for what I called The Smorgasbord Tour: Atlanta, Arlington, Houston, Arizona and San Diego.

Exploring each of these ballparks, talking with the fan base, experiencing the traditions and taking in the the atmosphere, have sparked some significant conversations and with each visit, I find that the book I am working on is slowly being framed in new ways.

Opening Day was so full of hope; visiting my “home” ballparks was an exercise in self-discovery which then spilled over into Atlanta, Arlington and Houston. Arizona sparked the the concept of conversion, and the green space in San Diego began planting thoughts of creation and Creator, gardens and Gardener.

And after two weeks back home, it’s time for the fourth phase of my ballpark tour…

The West Coast.

Tomorrow evening, my wife and I depart for Los Angeles, then on to Seattle, Oakland and San Francisco.

Here’s the list of ballparks, games and probable pitching matchups I’ll be seeing this week…*

  • 5/8 – San Francisco @ LA Dodgers (Vogelsong vs Beckett)
  • 5/9 – Kansas City @ Seattle (Vargas vs Maurer)
  • 5/10 – Washington @ Oakland (Roark vs Gray)
  • 5/12 – Atlanta @ San Francisco (Harang vs Lincecum)

* – Originally, I had the Angels on my list for tomorrow night, but a flight mix up is getting me to Los Angeles a few hours later than I had planned. Thankfully, my sister-in-law graduates from UCLA in mid-June and I’ll be back in the area to catch the Halos then. Phew.

Lots to love in this lineup.

First of all, and this is no offense to those I’ve already visited, but I think the ballparks are about to up their game immensely.

Dodger Stadium is the oldest ballpark not named Wrigley or Fenway.

Safeco Field is one of the more intriguing destinations. The roof is so unique, and Seattle just feels so far away.

I got to walk through AT&T park a couple winters ago. It was actually set up for a NCAA bowl game. Gorgeous views of the Bay Bridge and Treasure Island, and the Coke bottle and giant glove beyond left field have served as my Facebook banner ever since (image above).

And then there’s Oakland.

O.Co Coliseum is widely understood to be the worst ballpark in the MLB. The sewers backup in the locker rooms a few times a season. It’s one of the last football-convertible ballparks around, and the giant moveable grandstands in center field – known as Mount Davis, named after the late Raiders’ owner Al Davis – is a complete eye sore. The foul territory is enormous and pretty much anywhere you sit places you way too far away from the action.

However, I’m excited to see Sonny Gray in person. He was just tabbed as the AL Pitcher of the Month for April. He’s 4-1 with a 1.76 ERA so far this season. If the same Nationals team shows up in Oakland that did (or didn’t) in Atlanta, it should be a fun game to cheer for the home team.

I get to see the Royals play again. This time in Seattle and this time it’s Vargas instead if Ventura. Bummed it’s not King Felix too. Can’t win em all.

When Clayton Kershaw was making his comeback from injury, it started to look like he was going to get his first start back around this week. Instead, it’s tonight, and we’ll see Josh Beckett instead against Vogelsong. Still should be a solid matchup, but honestly, the mystique and excitement of seeing a game at the Chavez Ravine makes the game itself less crucial. However, If Yasiel Puig isn’t back from his encounter with the outfield wall by Thursday, I’ll be pretty bummed.

Finally, the marquee matchup of this week: Aaron Harang versus Tim Lincecum. Harang has been phenomenal – he threw 6 innings, 5 hits, 1 run when I saw him in ATL. Lincecum, a two-time Cy Young winner, hasn’t been great yet this year, and it’s probably his haircut that’s the issue. Really excited about this one.

Get ready for another series of ballpark posts from out west…and probably prepare for some late night ball game live-tweeting too.

-apc.

Game 5: Globe Life Park in Arlington

From the outside, Globe Life Park looks like more of a fortress than a ballpark. It is a massive brick structure with arched gates and peaked turrets, but it sits in the same complex as the Cowboys’ ridiculously huge AT&T Stadium so that makes it feel a bit less daunting. But don’t be fooled. It’s still Texas, and it’s still huge.

photo-21This was my second trip to the Ballpark. My last trip was 11 years ago. My family was in DFW for my cousin Ryan’s wedding, and the Royals happened to be in town that weekend too. Today, Ryan works for the fire department and he sports one of the most gnarly mustaches you’ll ever see. He and his family live in Abilene, TX, now, so he and his son, Graham, were able to join me for last night’s game.

The Rangers have been here since 1994, the year after Nolan Ryan retired, but his name is still found all over the place as he is the CEO of the Rangers today. Even the hot dogs are “Nolan Ryan Beef” dogs. Nolan Ryan has always been a favorite of my cousins*, and since I’m a handful of years younger, that’s probably the primary reason he’s been a favorite of mine over the years as well.

* – This might get a bit dicey trying to reference Nolan Ryan and my cousin, Ryan, in the same post. If you get confused, I understand. I’m trying my best to wordsmith so it’s clear. I do the same thing when I’m trying to avoid using the possessive form of Jesus’s name the name of Jesus in the possessive.

It’s funny how things like that rub off on you. Someone in your life you look up to likes something? Well, it’s only right that you adopt that thing too.

Oh, you like The Eagles, Dad? Yeah, me too.

Oh, you drink coffee, Mom? Yeah, me too.

Oh, you like Nolan Ryan, cuz? Yeah, me too.

It’s amazing how influential those people we admire truly are in our lives. I think if we all took a moment to think through our interests, careers and values, we could trace them all back to someone in our lives who modeled it for us.

Another individuals who I looked up to as a high schooler was my small group leader, Rapley, who now teaches accounting at the University of North Texas, and drove 45 minutes down from Denton to come to the game last night as well.

Rapley spent four years – freshman through senior year – committed to my group of friends at the church we grew up at. He was there week after week. Rapley wasn’t a youth pastor – he was an accountant in KC during those years – but he was present and committed to our group, and I looked up to him and he helped pastor me anyway.

Rapley was a K-State graduate, and he loved throwing around the Alf phrase, “Relax Willie, no problem!” I was too young to know the reference (and I still don’t really know it), but the guys in our group picked it up and worked it into our lexicon. Not because we knew the origin, but because if Rapley used it, then we wanted to too.

photo-20More importantly, I admired both of these men because of the way they taught me about being a man of God. Not through their intentional words, but through the way they lived their daily lives.

So the ability to be surrounded by Ryan and Rapley, both sitting with their sons, was an awesome experience for me last night in Arlington. They were spending time with me, sure, but more importantly, they were doing was shaping and forming their own sons.

I think something powerful happens when dads (or moms) take their sons (or daughters) to the events they care about. It’s a creator-created relationship, and the created child is being constantly formed in the way of the Creator.

I love getting to watch parents and kids interact at the ballpark. Dads teaching their sons to keep score. Moms dancing with their daughters in the aisles. Dads pointing out players and asking what number is on their uniform. Moms modeling for their sons cheers like, “Charge!” and “Let’s go [insert team name here]!” and “We want a single, S-I-N-G-L-E!” and more.

Baseball, unlike other sports, provides the perfect intimate setting for these interactions to take place. There is time to discuss and teach and invest in one another. It’s not just action packed intensity like football, and it’s not as fast-paced and noisy as basketball, and it provides breaks and silence in ways soccer and hockey doesn’t. It’s uniquely conversational and perfect for formation to take place.

All that to say, I loved being in the middle of these two father-son pairings. I’m thankful for these men in my life, and how they continue to model godliness to me through their love for their sons.

A couple additional notes before I move on to the game itself: the Rangers sell an item called the Boomstick. Which is a twenty-four inch hot dog for $26. It comes in a carrier that folds up with a handle and can be carried like a briefcase. We didn’t get one, but the family in front of us tag teamed one and licked the briefcase clean.

Also, the Rangers do a race called the Ozark Dot Race where three different color dots – Red, Blue and Green – race in from the left field warning track. It was fun to cheer for Relish Green, but then he finished last so clearly it’s rigged.

Game Notes:

The company was great, but the game itself stunk.

Colby Lewis was called up to make his first start in nearly 21 months for the Rangers. He’s a pretty cool story: Lewis was a major piece of the rotation during the 2010 and 2011 World Series teams, but hasn’t pitched since July 18, 2012. He’s spent the better part of 2 years trying to recover and finally made it back to start last night.

He had a respectable game. He gave up a solo homer in the 5th, and 2 runs to start the 6th. Lewis was pulled after that, and walked to the dugout to a standing ovation from the crowd. He looked sharp, which has to feel great for a guy who has worked so hard to get back there.

Unfortunately, the Rangers offense was pitiful again, and only managed 1 run the whole game. They hit into 4 double plays, and only had 3 batters reach 2nd base all night.

A day after watching the Braves offense exploding, I saw the Rangers bats do nothing at all against the Mariners’ Roenis Elias, who got his first win of his career.

The score was 1-0 going into the 6th, and everything still felt pretty good. Even after Lewis gave up 2 runs to make it 3-0, it felt like the Rangers still had a shot. But the defense made 3 errors and reliever Pedro Figeroa gave up 3 more hits en route to a 6 run inning for Seattle.

One of those errors was due to an overturned call. With the bases loaded, the Mariners chopped a ball back to Figeroa, who threw home to get the force out. The catcher, Arencibia, trying to transfer the ball out of his glove quickly and fire to first for the double play, dropped the ball taking it out of his glove.

Initially, the Rangers were given the out, but Mariners manager, Lloyd McClendon, challenged the call and Seattle picked up the run instead.

Then the most exciting moment of the game happened: Ron Washington got tossed. And fast.

Ryan’s question: “I wonder what he said to get himself thrown out so fast?”

photo-22Rangers got pounded, 7-1, and Prince Fielder’s #84 did nothing to help his physique.

Five down. Twenty-Five to go.

Up Next: Houston Astros.

-apc.